Dr. Eric Isaacs named 11th President of the Carnegie Institution for Science

By unanimous vote of the Carnegie Board of Trustees, Dr. Eric D. Isaacs has been appointed the 11th president of the Carnegie Institution for Science. Dr. Isaacs joins Carnegie from the University of Chicago and will succeed Interim Co-Presidents John Mulchaey and Yixian Zheng on July 2, 2018.

Explore this Story

Give to Carnegie

You Can Support Scientific Discovery.

Learn More

Former-Energy Secretary and nuclear physicist Ernest Moniz received Carnegie’s inaugural Richard A. Meserve Public Service award Thursday in recognition of his “exemplary leadership and accomplishment in furthering public understanding of science.”

Explore this Story

Allan C. Spradling, Director Emeritus of Carnegie’s Department of Embryology, has been awarded the 23rd March of Dimes and Richard B. Johnson, Jr., MD Prize in Developmental Biology as “an outstanding scientist who has profoundly advanced the science that underlies our understanding of prenatal development and pregnancy.”

Explore this Story

It is commonly believed that when looking for valuable treasure, the best place to look is the attic—after all, works by Caravaggio, Van Gogh, Rembrandt, and Jackson Pollack have been discovered in attics—but not everyone thinks to look in the basement. Yet institutions like Carnegie Observatories often keep the best stuff in the basement, including "heir of Edwin Hubble" Allan Sandage’s personal collection of astronomical glass plates.

Explore this Story

Stay Connected

Sign Up to Receive Carnegie Communications. 

If you are interested in receiving any of our materials, learn more

Venkata Srinu Bhadram in Timothy Strobel’s lab at the Geophysical Laboratory (GL) will receive the ninth Postdoctoral Innovation and Excellence Award (PIE). These awards are made through nominations from the departments and are chosen by the Office of the President. The recipients are awarded a cash prize for their exceptionally creative approaches to science, strong mentoring, and contributing to the sense of campus community.

Explore this Story
Carnegie will receive Phase II funding through Grand Challenges Explorations, an initiative created by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation that enables individuals worldwide to test bold ideas to address persistent health and development challenges. Department of Plant Biology Director Wolf...
Explore this Project
Along with Alycia Weinberger and Ian Thompson, Alan Boss has been running the Carnegie Astrometric Planet Search (CAPS) program, which searches for extrasolar planets by the astrometric method, where the planet's presence is detected indirectly through the wobble of the host star around the center...
Explore this Project
High-elevation, low relief surfaces are common on continents. These intercontinental plateaus influence river networks, climate, and the migration of plants and animals. How these plateaus form is not clear. Researchers are studying the geodynamic processes responsible for surface uplift in the...
Explore this Project
Astronomy Lecture Series
Monday, May 21, 2018 - 6:15pm

As Carl Sagan once said, "We are made of star stuff." However, each element has its own astronomical origins story. Elements are created everywhere from the centers of stars, to supernovae...

Explore this Event
Capital Science Evening Lectures
Carnegie Science, Carnegie Institution, Carnegie Institution for Science, RedSeal
Wednesday, May 23, 2018 - 6:30pm to 8:30pm

The new reality is that all digitally networked enterprises and organizations will fall under cyberattack and be breached.  RedSeal CEO Ray Rothrock will be speaking about his new book Digital...

Explore this Event
Broad Branch Road Neighborhood Lectures
Carnegie Science, Carnegie Institution, Carnegie Institution for Science, Timothy Strobel
Thursday, May 24, 2018 - 6:30pm to 7:45pm

From stone to steel to silicon, materials shape the world in which we live. Nearly every aspect of our lives is governed by the availability of materials with specific properties, and new advanced...

Explore this Event
Gwen Rudie
Gwen Rudie studies the chemical and physical properties of very distant galaxies and their surrounding gas in order to further our understanding of the processes that are central to the formation and development of galaxies. Critical to this research is our ability to trace the raw materials of...
Meet this Scientist
Viktor Struzhkin develops new techniques for high-pressure experiments to measure transport and magnetic properties of materials to understand aspects of geophysics, planetary science, and condensed-matter physics. Among his goals are to detect the transition of hydrogen into a high-temperature...
Meet this Scientist
Integrity of hereditary material—the genome —is critical for species survival. Genomes need protection from agents that can cause mutations affecting DNA coding, regulatory functions, and duplication during cell division. DNA sequences called transposons, or jumping genes (discovered by Carnegie’s...
Meet this Scientist

Explore Carnegie Science

May 21, 2018

Washington, D.C. –The DC STEM Network is one of eight groups to win the US2020’s 2018 STEM Coalition Challenge. The Challenge was a nationwide competition for communities toincrease hands-on STEM mentoring and maker-centered learning to underrepresented students. The winners were announced at the Bay Area Maker Faire in San Mateo, CA, last week. The DC STEM Network will receive a share of a $1 million award which will support further innovative, STEM-based learning for Washington, DC students.

The Network was selected from 92 applications from 35 states, representing more than 1,800 nonprofits, companies, school districts, and local government partners. The Network is a

Eric D Isaacs will be the 11th President of the Carnegie Institution for Science
May 10, 2018

Washington, D.C.—By unanimous vote of the Carnegie Board of Trustees, Dr. Eric D. Isaacs has been appointed the 11th president of the Carnegie Institution for Science. Dr. Isaacs joins Carnegie from the University of Chicago and will succeed Interim Co-Presidents John Mulchaey and Yixian Zheng on July 2, 2018.

Dr. Isaacs is currently the Executive Vice President for Research, Innovation and National Laboratories and the Robert A. Millikan Distinguished Service Professor of Physics at the University of Chicago, where he directly oversees the Argonne National Laboratory and Fermilab for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science and the university’s partnership with the Giant

May 8, 2018

Washington, DC—Former-Energy Secretary and nuclear physicist Ernest Moniz received Carnegie’s inaugural Richard A. Meserve Public Service award Thursday in recognition of his “exemplary leadership and accomplishment in furthering public understanding of science.”

Named after Carnegie's president emeritus, the honor was created to recognize science educators, policymakers, philanthropists, and outreach-oriented research scientists who make exceptional contributions to the scientific enterprise through advancing the public’s understanding of science and its role in the betterment of humankind.

“Ernest Moniz is more than just a fine physicist, he’s also a dedicated public

May 7, 2018

Baltimore, MD—Allan C. Spradling, Director Emeritus of Carnegie’s Department of Embryology, has been awarded the 23rd March of Dimes and Richard B. Johnson, Jr., MD Prize in Developmental Biology as “an outstanding scientist who has profoundly advanced the science that underlies our understanding of prenatal development and pregnancy.”

Department director and Carnegie co-interim president Yixian Zheng remarked, “Allan is a legend in developmental biology. We are all delighted by this well- deserved recognition of Allan’s groundbreaking research.”

Spradling’s decades of scientific accomplishments cover a broad spectrum of advancements. Since the early 20th century, the fruit

May 21, 2018

As Carl Sagan once said, "We are made of star stuff." However, each element has its own astronomical origins story. Elements are created everywhere from the centers of stars, to supernovae explosions, to the Big Bang itself. Dr. Drout will take us on a journey through the periodic table, highlighting how our recent discovery of a 'kilonova' associated with the cataclysmic merger of two neutron stars has filled in one of the final pieces of the elemental puzzle—the origin of many of the heaviest elements in the universe.

Maria Drout: Hubble, Carnegie-Dunlap Fellow, Carnegie Observatories

#StarStuff

Carnegie Science, Carnegie Institution, Carnegie Institution for Science, RedSeal
May 23, 2018

The new reality is that all digitally networked enterprises and organizations will fall under cyberattack and be breached.  RedSeal CEO Ray Rothrock will be speaking about his new book Digital Resilience, which explores the threats we face, how to assess the resiliency of networks, how to identify and address weaknesses, and how to respond to exploits swiftly and effectively.  He will be joined by cybersecurity expert and former U.S. National Coordinator for Security, Infrastructure Protection and Counter-terrorism  Richard A. Clarke for a discussion about the future of cybersecurity.

Ray Rothrock: CEO, RedSeal

#DigitalResilience

    Pre-order your copy from Politics

Carnegie Science, Carnegie Institution, Carnegie Institution for Science, Timothy Strobel
May 24, 2018

From stone to steel to silicon, materials shape the world in which we live. Nearly every aspect of our lives is governed by the availability of materials with specific properties, and new advanced materials are needed to address current societal issues. Using a combination of high-performance computation and advanced experimental synthesis, we now have unprecedented control over the design and fabrication of materials with application-specific properties. In this lecture, Dr. Strobel will provide an overview of recent discoveries – including new materials to revolutionize our use of solar energy and novel structures that are stronger than diamond – and will paint a picture of a new

Carnegie Science, Carnegie Institution, Carnegie Institution for Science, MIT
June 12, 2018

The direct measurement of gravitational waves predicted by Albert Einstein 100 years ago has opened a new field of science – gravitational wave astrophysics and astronomy. The recent discoveries and the prospects for the new field will be presented.

Dr. Rainer Weiss: Nobel Laureate in Physics & Kavli Prize Laureate in Astrophysics; Emeritus Professor of Physics, MIT, on behalf of the LIGO Scientific Collaboration

#GravitationalWaves

Co-hosted by the Carnegie Institution for Science with The Kavli Foundation, the Royal Embassy of Norway, and the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters. The Kavli Prize is a partnership between The Norwegian Academy of Science and

Along with Alycia Weinberger and Ian Thompson, Alan Boss has been running the Carnegie Astrometric Planet Search (CAPS) program, which searches for extrasolar planets by the astrometric method, where the planet's presence is detected indirectly through the wobble of the host star around the center of mass of the system. With over eight years of CAPSCam data, they are beginning to see likely true astrometric wobbles beginning to appear. The CAPSCam planet search effort is on the verge of yielding a harvest of astrometrically discovered planets, as well as accurate parallactic distances to many young stars and M dwarfs. For more see  http://instrumentation.obs.carnegiescience.edu/ccd/caps.

Carnegie researchers are developing new scientific approaches that integrate phylogenetic, chemical and spectral remote sensing perspectives - called Spectranomics - to map canopy function and biological diversity throughout tropical forests of the world.

Mapping the composition and chemistry of species in tropical forests is critical to understanding forest functions related to human use and climate change. However, high-resolution mapping of tropical forest canopies is challenging because traditional field, airborne and satellite measurements cannot easily measure the canopy chemical or taxonomic variation among species over large regions. New technology, such as the Carnegie

The Carnegie Irvine Galaxy Survey is obtaining high-quality optical and near-infrared images of several hundred of the brightest galaxies in the southern hemisphere sky, at Carnegie’s Las Campanas Observatory to investigate the structural properties of galaxies. For more see    http://cgs.obs.carnegiescience.edu/CGS/Home.html

The Fan laboratory studies the molecular mechanisms that govern mammalian development, using the mouse as a model. They use a combination of biochemical, molecular and genetic approaches to identify and characterize signaling molecules and pathways that control the development and maintenance of the musculoskeletal and hypothalamic systems.

The musculoskeletal system provides the mechanical support for our posture and movement. How it arises during embryogenesis pertains to the basic problem of embryonic induction. How the components of this system are repaired after injury and maintained throughout life is of biological and clinical significance. They study how this system is

The first step in gene expression is the formation of an RNA copy of its DNA. This step, called transcription, takes place in the cell nucleus. Transcription requires an enzyme called RNA polymerase to catalyze the synthesis of the RNA from the DNA template. This, in addition to other processing factors, is needed before messenger RNA (mRNA) can be exported to the cytoplasm, the area surrounding the nucleus.

Although the biochemical details of transcription and RNA processing are known, relatively little is understood about their cellular organization. Joseph G. Gall has been an intellectual leader and has made seminal breakthroughs in our understanding of chromosomes, nuclei and

Alan Boss is a theorist and an observational astronomer. His theoretical work focuses on the formation of binary and multiple stars, triggered collapse of the presolar cloud that eventually made  the Solar System, mixing and transport processes in protoplanetary disks, and the formation of gas giant and ice giant protoplanets. His observational works centers on the Carnegie Astrometric Planet Search project, which has been underway for the last decade at Carnegie's Las Campanas Observatory in Chile.

While fragmentation is universally recognized as the dominant formation mechanism for binary and multiple stars, there are still major questions. The most important of these is the

Geochemist Steven Shirey is researching how Earth's continents formed. Continent formation spans most of Earth's history, continents were key to the emergence of life, and they contain a majority of Earth’s resources. Continental rocks also retain the geologic record of Earth's ancient geodynamic processes.

Shirey’s past, current, and future studies reflect the diversity of continental rocks, encompassing a range of studies that include rocks formed anywhere from the deep mantle to the surface crust. His work spans a wide range of geologic settings such as volcanic rocks in continental rifts (giant crustal breaks where continents split apart), ancient and present subduction zones

Carnegie Observatories Director John Mulchaey and Carnegie Embryology Director Yixian Zheng serve jointly as interim Co-Presidents of Carnegie following the retirement of Matthew Scott. During this period, Mulchaey and Zheng will continue in their directorship roles at their respective departments.

John Mulchaey investigates groups and clusters of galaxies, elliptical galaxies, dark matter—the invisible material that makes up most of the universe—active galaxies and black holes. He is also actively involved in public outreach and education.

Most galaxies including our own Milky Way exist in collections known as groups, which are the most common galaxy systems and are