Washington, DC— An international team of astronomers including Carnegie’s Paul Butler has found clear evidence of a planet orbiting Proxima Centauri, the closest star to our Solar System. The new world, designated Proxima b, orbits its cool red parent star every 11 days and has a temperature...
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  • Quasars are supermassive black holes that sit at the center of enormous galaxies, accreting matter. They shine so brightly that they are often referred to as beacons and are among the most-distant objects we can currently study. A team has discovered 63 new quasars from when the universe was only a billion years old, almost doubling the number of ancient quasars previously known.

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    Learning about ‪#photosynthesis is fun! Life as we know it on Earth couldn't exist without this amazing process. And what better way to understand and appreciate everything that plants and algae do for us than through this amazing song from Carnegie Plant Biology and Jonathan Mann?
    Jonathan Mann with Liz Freeman Rosenzweig and 3 others.

    Do the Photosynthesis dance! It's easy and fun!

    I made this video and song with the very fine plant biologists at the Jonikas lab! They study algae!

    It was funded by the NSF.

    Watch This Video

Stanford, CA—The Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) and the Simons Foundation have awarded José Dinneny, of Carnegie’s Department of Plant Biology an HHMI-Simons Faculty Scholar grant. He is one of 84 scientists chosen out of some 1,400 applicants in a new program that the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), the Simons Foundation, and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation have created.

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Washington, D.C.— Carnegie Science is excited to launch a new immersive program called Expedition Earth: Roads to Discovery. These experiences are more than just another lecture series (although, don't get us wrong, we still love our Capital Science Evening talks). The events will initiate attendees into the globetrotting lives of wildlife photographers, field scientists, and conservationists.

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Scientists have looked for different ways to force hydrogen into a metallic state for decades. Metallic hydrogen is a holy grail for materials science because it could be used for superconductors, materials that have no resistance to the flow of electrons, increasing electrical efficiency many times over. For the first time researchers, led by Carnegie’s Viktor Struzhkin, have experimentally produced a new class of materials blending hydrogen with sodium that could alter the superconductivity landscape.

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Washington, D.C.—  Zehra Nizami has been a graduate student and postdoc in Joe Gall’s lab at the Department of Embryology. She is the fourth recipient of the Postdoctoral Innovation and Excellence (PIE) Award, which are made through nominations from the department directors and chosen by the Office of the President. Her career at Embryology includes outstanding accomplishments in the three areas recognized by the PIE Award—science, education, and community service.

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Carnegie researchers are developing new scientific approaches that integrate phylogenetic, chemical and spectral remote sensing perspectives - called Spectranomics - to map canopy function and biological diversity throughout tropical forests of the world. Mapping the composition and chemistry of...
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Stem cells make headline news as potential treatments for a variety of diseases. But undertstanding the nuts and bolts of how they develop from an undifferentiated cell  that gives rise to cells that are specialized such as organs, or bones, and the nervous system, is not well understood.  The...
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Superdeep diamonds are  tiny time capsules carrying unchanged impurities made eons ago and providing researchers with important clues about Earth’s formation.  Diamonds derived from below the continental lithosphere, are most likely from the transition zone (415 miles, or 670km deep) or the top of...
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Capital Science Evening Lectures
Thursday, September 29, 2016 -
6:30pm to 7:45pm

Everything in nature is regulated—from the number of vital molecules found in our bloodstreams to the number of lions living on an African savanna. Over the past 50 years, two revolutions have...

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Capital Science Evening Lectures
Thursday, October 13, 2016 -
6:30pm to 7:45pm

KAVLI PRIZE LAUREATE LECTURE

Everyone learns in school that DNA is the genetic coding material  found in all organisms. However, the information storage capacity that...

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Special Events
Thursday, October 20, 2016 -
6:00pm to 8:00pm

(doors open at 5:30)

 

Dialogues with Nature - A Presentation by Photographer Frans Lanting

Hailed as one of the great photographers of our time, Frans...

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The first step in gene expression is the formation of an RNA copy of its DNA. This step, called transcription, takes place in the cell nucleus. Transcription requires an enzyme called RNA polymerase to catalyze the synthesis of the RNA from the DNA template. This, in addition to other processing...
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Plants are essential to life on Earth and provide us with food, fuel, clothing, and shelter.  Despite all this, we know very little about how they do what they do. Even for the best-studied species, such as Arabidopsis thaliana --a wild mustard studied in the lab--we know about less than 20% of...
Meet this Scientist
Scott Sheppard studies the dynamical and physical properties of small bodies in our Solar System, such as asteroids, comets, moons and trans-neptunian objects (bodies that orbit beyond Neptune).  These objects have a fossilized imprint from the formation and migration of the major planets in our...
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September 23, 2016

Washington, D.C.—  Zehra Nizami has been a graduate student and postdoc in Joe Gall’s lab at the Department of Embryology. She is the fourth recipient of the Postdoctoral Innovation and Excellence (PIE) Award, which are made through nominations from the department directors and chosen by the Office of the President. Her career at Embryology includes outstanding accomplishments in the three areas recognized by the PIE Award—science, education, and community service.

Nizami is co-discoverer of a new class of RNA molecules in amphibian egg cells called stable intronic sequence (sis) RNA. These sequences were not anticipated. It was believed for 35 years that introns—bits of DNA that

September 22, 2016

Baltimore, MD--BioEYES, the K-12 science education program headquartered at  Carnegie's Department of Embryology, was recognized with four other organizations by the General Motors Foundation, at the GM Baltimore Operations plant where they make transmissions. The BioEYES group was honored for their environmental education program, “Your Watershed, Your Backyard, a middle school learning experience that teaches students about stream ecology.GM has the most energy-efficient plants of any corporation in the world, for which they have won distinctions. BioEYE's Valerie Butler is second from left in the photo.
 

September 22, 2016

Washington, D.C.— Carnegie Science is excited to launch a new immersive program called Expedition Earth: Roads to Discovery. These experiences are more than just another lecture series (although, don't get us wrong, we still love our Capital Science Evening talks). The events will initiate attendees into the globetrotting lives of wildlife photographers, field scientists, and conservationists. But they will go beyond the auditorium to offer an interactive, inclusive experience. If you accept our invitation to adventure, you will get to hear daring tales of travel and then engage with the night's featured explorer, as well as with a range of fun games and activities. Did we mention the

September 22, 2016

Stanford, CA—The Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) and the Simons Foundation have awarded José Dinneny, of Carnegie’s Department of Plant Biology an HHMI-Simons Faculty Scholar grant. He is one of 84 scientists chosen out of some 1,400 applicants in a new program that the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), the Simons Foundation, and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation have created. The grant will provide $250,000 per year for five years, in addition to overhead expenses, for an award total of $1,500,000.

The award will be funded by the Simons Foundation and administered by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Faculty Scholars are “early-career scientists who have

September 29, 2016

Everything in nature is regulated—from the number of vital molecules found in our bloodstreams to the number of lions living on an African savanna. Over the past 50 years, two revolutions have occurred in the study of biology that help scientists understand how life is regulated on both of these scales. Dr. Carroll will discuss the discovery of the so-called "Serengeti Rules," which govern the number and kinds of animals and plants that are found in any given place, and talk about how these rules can be applied to restoring ecological health.

Dr. Sean B. Carroll, Professor, Molecular Biology and Genetics, University of Wisconsin; Vice President for Science Education, Howard Hughes

October 13, 2016

KAVLI PRIZE LAUREATE LECTURE

Everyone learns in school that DNA is the genetic coding material  found in all organisms. However, the information storage capacity that enables DNA to function in the world of biology can also be exploited to control the creation of 3D molecular structures. Dr. Seeman will talk about how DNA can be programmed readily to make objects, crystals, and even nanomechanical devices!

Dr. Nadrian C. Seeman, Margaret and Herman Sokol Professor of Chemistry, New York University

Co-hosted by the Carnegie Institution for Science with The Kavli Foundation, the Royal Embassy of Norway, and the Norwegian Academy of Science

October 20, 2016

(doors open at 5:30)

 

Dialogues with Nature - A Presentation by Photographer Frans Lanting

Hailed as one of the great photographers of our time, Frans Lanting has documented the natural world for more than four decades. From the Amazon to Antarctica, he uses his camera as a powerful tool for promoting a public understanding of the incredible scope of life on Earth. His stunning images convey a passion for nature and a sense of wonder about our living planet.

In this talk, Lanting will present his work as an ongoing dialogue with the natural world. He will explain how his images -- "conversations" with nature -- have been influenced by science and technology. Of

October 20, 2016

Please note that tickets are not required and seating is first come, first serve. Tickets from Eventbrite enable you to skip the sign-in process at the door, but do not guarantee a seat. 

Astronomers use large and increasingly more intricate telescopes to see further and further into the cosmos with ever-improving resolution.  These instruments have lead to the discovery of other planets around distant stars, some of which might be capable of supporting life.  But the key to life’s evolution on Earth is the development and persistence of plate tectonics, a planetary process that affects everything from the mineral composition of the continents on which we stand to the existence of

The Earthbound Planet Search Program has discovered hundreds of planets orbiting nearby stars using telescopes at Lick Observatory, Keck Observatory, the Anglo-Australian Observatory, Carnegie's Las Campanas Observatory, and the ESO Paranal Observatory.  Our multi-national team has been collecting data for 30 years, using the Precision Doppler technique.  Highlights of this program include the detection of five of the first six exoplanets, the first eccentric planet, the first multiple planet system, the first sub-Saturn mass planet, the first sub-Neptune mass planet, the first terrestrial mass planet, and the first transit planet.Over the course of 30 years we have improved the

CDAC is a multisite, interdisciplinary center headquartered at Carnegie to advance and perfect an extensive set of high pressure and temperature techniques and facilities, to perform studies on a broad range of materials in newly accessible pressure and temperature regimes, and to integrate and coordinate static, dynamic and theoretical results. The research objectives include making highly accurate measurements to understand the transitions of materials into different phases under the multimegabar pressure rang; determine the electronic and magnetic properties of solids and fluid to multimegabar pressures and elevated temperatures; to bridge the gap between static and dynamic

The NASA Astrobiology Institute (NAI) Carnegie Team focuses on life’s chemical and physical evolution, from the interstellar medium, through planetary systems, to the emergence and detection of life by studying extrasolar planets, Solar System formation, organic rich primitive planetary bodies, prebiotic molecular synthesis through catalyzing with minerals, and the connection between planetary evolution to the emergence, and sustenance of biology. This program attempts to integrate the sweeping narrative of life’s history through a combination of bottom-up and top-down studies. On the one hand, this team studies processes related to chemical and physical evolution in plausible prebiotic

In March 2014, a technical support unit (TSU) of ten, headquartered at Global Ecology, had successfully completed a herculean management effort for the 2000-page assessment Climate Change 2014: Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability, including two summaries. They were issued by the United Nations (UN) Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Working Group II co-chaired by Chris Field, Global Ecology director, with science co-directors Katie Mach and Mike Mastrandrea managing the input of over 190 governments and nearly 2,000 experts from around the world.

The IPCC, established in 1988, assesses information about climate change and its impacts. In September 2008, Field was

Juna Kollmeier’s research is an unusual combination—she is as observationally-oriented theorist making predictions that can be compared to current and future observations. Her primary focus is on the emergence of structure in the universe. She combines cosmological hydrodynamic simulations and analytic theory to figure out how the tiny fluctuations in density that were present when the universe was only 300 thousand years old, become the galaxies and black holes that we see now, after 14 billion years of cosmic evolution. 

 She has a three-pronged approach to unravelling the mysteries of the universe. On the largest scales, she studies the intergalactic medium (IGM)—the tenuous

One way to adapt to climate change is to understand how plants can thrive in the changing environment. José Dinneny looks at the mechanisms that control environmental responses in plants, including responses to salty soils and different moisture conditions—work that provides the foundation for developing crops for the changing climate.

The Dinneny  lab focuses on understanding how developmental processes such as cell-type specification regulate responses to environmental change. Most studies have considered the organ or even the whole organism as a single responsive unit and ignore the potential diversity of responses by the various cell-types composing an organism. Dinneny has

Peter Driscoll studies the evolution of Earth’s core and magnetic field including magnetic pole reversal. Over the last 20 million or so years, the north and south magnetic poles on Earth have reversed about every 200,000, to 300,000 years and is now long overdue. He also investigates the Earth’s inner core structure; core-mantle coupling; tectonic-volatile cycling; orbital migration—how Earth’s orbit moves—and tidal dissipation—the dissipation of tidal forces between two closely orbiting bodies. He is also interested in planetary interiors, dynamos, upper planetary atmospheres and exoplanets—planets orbiting other stars. He uses large-scale numerical simulations in much of his research

Earth scientist Robert Hazen has an unusually rich research portfolio. He is trying to understand the carbon cycle from deep inside the Earth; chemical interactions at crystal-water interfaces; the interactions of organic molecules on mineral surfaces as a possible springboard to life; how life arose from the chemical to the biological world; how life emerges in extreme environments; and the origin and distribution of life in the universe  just to name a few topics. In tandem with this expansive Carnegie work, he is also the Clarence Robinson Professor of Earth Science at George Mason University. He has authored more than 350 articles and 20 books on science, history, and music.