Washington, DC— New work from an international team of researchers including Carnegie’s Lara Wagner improves our understanding of the geological activity that is thought to have formed the Rocky Mountains. It is published by Nature. Subduction is a geological process that occurs at the boundary...
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  • Pasadena, CA— Astronomer and instrumentation expert Stephen Shectman of the Carnegie Observatories has been selected to receive the Maria and Eric Muhlmann Award from the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, “for important research results based upon development of groundbreaking instruments and techniques.” He will receive the prize in October.

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Plants form a vast network of below-ground roots that search soil for needed resources. The structure and function of this root network can be highly adapted to particular environments. Excavation of root systems reveals these kinds of adaptations but is laborious, time consuming, and does not provide information on how growing roots behave. A new imaging tool from a team led by Carnegie’s José Dinneny allows researchers to study the dynamic growth of root systems in soil, and to uncover the molecular signaling pathways that control such growth.

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Washington, DC—New research from a team led by Carnegie’s Robert Hazen predicts that Earth has more than 1,500 undiscovered minerals and that the exact mineral diversity of our planet is unique and could not be duplicated anywhere in the cosmos.

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Washington, DC—Colossal magnetoresistance is a property with practical applications in a wide array of electronic tools including magnetic sensors and magnetic RAM. New research from a team including Carnegie’s Maria Baldini, Ho-Kwang “Dave” Mao, Takaki Muramatsu, and Viktor Struzhkin successfully used high-pressure conditions to induce colossal magnetoresistance for the first time in a pure sample of a compound called lanthanum manganite, LaMnO3.

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Baltimore, MD—Carnegie’s BioEYES K-12 science educational program launches a new center sponsored by the University of Utah, Department of Pediatrics, Pediatric Research Enterprise. The new program manager and educator of BioEYES Utah, Judith Neugebauer, will use her zebrafish research experience to introduce students to the scientific method with a hands-on learning opportunity to watch live, transparent, zebrafish embryos develop.

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Anna Michalak’s team combined sampling and satellite-based observations of Lake Erie with computer simulations and determined that the 2011 record-breaking algal bloom in the lake was triggered by long-term agricultural practices coupled with extreme precipitation, followed by weak lake circulation...
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Following Andrew Carnegie’s founding encouragement of liberal discovery-driven research, the Carnegie Institution for Science offers its scientists a new resource for pursuing bold ideas.   Carnegie Science Venture grants are internal awards of up to $100,000 that are intended to foster entirely...
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The Carnegie Hubble program is an ongoing comprehensive effort that has a goal of determining the Hubble constant, the expansion rate of the universe,  to a systematic accuracy of 2%. As part of this program, astronomers are obtaining data at the 3.6 micron wavelength using the Infrared Array...
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Capital Science Evening Lectures
Thursday, September 17, 2015 - 6:45pm to 8:00pm

Modern tomatoes lack the intense flavor of heirloom, grown-in-your-back-yard varieties. What exactly is “tomato flavor”? Where did it go and what can we do about it? We believe that better flavor...

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Broad Branch Road Neighborhood Lectures
Thursday, September 24, 2015 - 7:00pm to 8:00pm

How did a leafy tract on the rural fringe of Washington a century ago become home to a world-class think tank for scientific research? Join us for an evening of history and science as Carnegie...

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Broad Branch Road Neighborhood Lectures
Thursday, October 15, 2015 - 5:30pm to 7:30pm

Minerals record information that is vital to our understanding of Earth’s formation and evolution. Join me as I take you on a journey to explore a group of minerals that form from magmas. Hidden...

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Director Emeritus, George Preston has been deciphering the chemical evolution of stars in our Milky Way for a quarter of a century. He and Steve Shectman started this quest using a special technique to conduct a needle-in-the-haystack search for the few, first-generation stars, whose chemical...
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Scientists simulate the high pressures and temperatures of planetary interiors to measure their physical properties. Yingwei Fei studies the composition and structure of planetary interiors with high-pressure instrumentation including the multianvil apparatus, the piston cylinder, and the diamond...
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Russell  Hemley examines the properties of materials at high pressures for uses in experimental and theoretical studies in condensed matter physics and materials science.  He uses optical spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and diamond-cell techniques. Hemley explores the chemistry of materials over a...
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August 28, 2015

Pasadena, CA— Astronomer and instrumentation expert Stephen Shectman of the Carnegie Observatories has been selected to receive the Maria and Eric Muhlmann Award from the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, “for important research results based upon development of groundbreaking instruments and techniques.” He will receive the prize in October.

 Shectman investigates the large-scale structure of the distribution of galaxies.  He searches for ancient stars; develops novel and creative astronomical instruments; and constructs large telescopes. He was the project scientist for the 6.5-meter Magellan telescopes and is largely responsible for their superb quality. Shectman served as

August 26, 2015

Washington, DC—New research from a team led by Carnegie’s Robert Hazen predicts that Earth has more than 1,500 undiscovered minerals and that the exact mineral diversity of our planet is unique and could not be duplicated anywhere in the cosmos.

Minerals form from novel combinations of elements. These combinations can be facilitated by both geological activity, including volcanoes, plate tectonics, and water-rock interactions, and biological activity, such as chemical reactions with oxygen and organic material.

Nearly a decade ago, Hazen developed the idea that the diversity explosion of planet’s minerals from the dozen present at the birth of our Solar System to the nearly

August 25, 2015

The ancient lunar surface once erupted with geysers of lava — and now, a team of scientists including Carnegie's Erik Hauri think they know what caused those fiery fountains. More

August 25, 2015

Carnegie Family of Institutions Pays Tribute to Andrew Carnegie’s Legacy of Philanthropy

The eight recipients of the prestigious  Carnegie Medal of Philanthropy were announced today by Carnegie Corporation of New York, on behalf of the international consortium of Carnegie institutions. Among the most charitable and visionary philanthropists in America, the recipients embody the spirit of giving set forth by Andrew Carnegie, each having had significant and lasting impact on a particular field, nation, or the international community. Medalists’ generosity has also influenced a wide range of issues, including education, the environment, cancer research, culture, the arts, science,

September 17, 2015

Modern tomatoes lack the intense flavor of heirloom, grown-in-your-back-yard varieties. What exactly is “tomato flavor”? Where did it go and what can we do about it? We believe that better flavor leads directly to better, healthier food choices. So we have systematically taken apart the chemistry and genetics of flavor in order to understand and restore it to its former glory. Along the way we’ve learned some amazing things about the way we taste and smell that have major implications for foods.

Dr. Harry Klee, University of Florida, Horticultural Sciences Department

Link to live stream will be posted a couple weeks before the porgram.

September 24, 2015

How did a leafy tract on the rural fringe of Washington a century ago become home to a world-class think tank for scientific research? Join us for an evening of history and science as Carnegie librarian Shaun Hardy recounts the fascinating story of the Broad Branch Road campus – from its inception in 1914 as a “mission control center” for magnetic survey expeditions and sailing ships that crisscrossed the globe to its present role as an interdisciplinary research center for the Earth and planetary sciences.

Using historic photos from Carnegie’s archives we’ll explore the atom-smashers, radio telescopes, and other cutting-edge facilities erected “on the hill” over the past 100

October 15, 2015

Minerals record information that is vital to our understanding of Earth’s formation and evolution. Join me as I take you on a journey to explore a group of minerals that form from magmas. Hidden within these minerals are records of magmatic events that lead to volcanic eruptions and are recorded in the form of chemical and isotopic profiles. Discover how these profiles can be used to visualize the transport of magma inside a volcano.

October 21, 2015

To celebrate the 20th anniversary of the first discovery of exoplanets - planets around other stars - Carnegie Institution for Science and NASA Exoplanet Exploration Program are hosting a special program, highlighting prominent scientists connected to the discovery and our understanding of exoplanets. Please join us for an interactive exhibit, followed by a panel discussion concerning the past, present, and future of exoplanet research.

Speakers TBA

Co-hosted by the Carnegie Institution for Science and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

In mammals, most lipids, such as fatty acids and cholesterol, are absorbed into the body via the small intestine. The complexity of the cells and fluids that inhabit this organ make it very difficult to study in a laboratory setting. The goal of the Farber lab is to better understand the cell and molecular biology of lipids within digestive organs by exploiting the many unique attributes of the clear zebrafish larva  to visualize lipid uptake and processing in real time.  Given their utmost necessity for proper cellular function, it is not surprising that defects in lipid metabolism underlie a number of human diseases, including obesity, diabetes, and atherosclerosis.

The Farber

Scientific literacy is now recognized to be crucial for our nation's progress in the 21st century.

The Carnegie Institution, a pre-eminent basic research organization, has fostered the development of scientific knowledge since the early 20th century. For many years, this meant the training of graduate students and postdoctoral fellows in the Institution's laboratories, located in Washington, DC and around the country.

In 1989, Maxine Singer, then president of Carnegie, founded First Light, a Saturday science school for children. This was the start of the Carnegie Academy for Science Education (CASE) whose goal is to encourage interest in science among school children and

In March 2014, a technical support unit (TSU) of ten, headquartered at Global Ecology, had successfully completed a herculean management effort for the 2000-page assessment Climate Change 2014: Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability, including two summaries. They were issued by the United Nations (UN) Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Working Group II co-chaired by Chris Field, Global Ecology director, with science co-directors Katie Mach and Mike Mastrandrea managing the input of over 190 governments and nearly 2,000 experts from around the world.

The IPCC, established in 1988, assesses information about climate change and its impacts. In September 2008, Field was

Chris Field is a co-principal investigator of the Jasper Ridge Global Change Experiment at the Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve in northern California. The site, designed to exploit grasslands as models for understanding how ecosystems may respond to climate change, hosts a number of studies of the potential effects from elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide, elevated temperature, increased precipitation, and increased nitrogen deposition. The site houses experimental plots that replicate all possible combinations of the four treatments and additional sampling sites that control for the effects of project infrastructure. Studies focus on several integrated ecosystem responses to the

The earliest galaxies are those that are most distant. Staff associate Dan Kelson is interested in how these ancient relics evolved. The latest generation of telescopes and advanced spectrographs—instruments that analyze light to determine properties of celestial objects—allow astronomers to accurately measure enormous numbers of distant galaxies. Kelson uses the Magellan 6.5-meter telescopes and high-resolution imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope to study distant galaxies.His observations of their masses, sizes and morphologies allow him to directly measure their stars' aging to infer their formation history. Kelson is the principal investigator of the Carnegie-Spitzer-IMACS

Ken Caldeira has been a Carnegie investigator since 2005 and is world renowned for his modeling and other work on the global carbon cycle; marine biogeochemistry and chemical oceanography, including ocean acidification and the atmosphere/ocean carbon cycle; land-cover and climate change; the long-term evolution of climate and geochemical cycles; climate intervention proposals; and energy technology.

 Caldeira was a lead author for the U.N.’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) AR5 report and was coordinating lead author of the oceans chapter for the 2005 IPCC report on carbon capture and storage. He was a co-author of the 2010 US National Academy America's Climate

Roiling cauldrons of liquid-laden material flow within Earth’s rocky interior. Understanding how this matter moves and changes is essential to deciphering Earth’s formation and evolution as well as the processes that create seismic activity, such as earthquakes and volcanoes. Bjørn Mysen probes this hidden environment in the laboratory and, based on his results, models can help explain what goes on in this remote realm.

Mysen investigates changes in the atomic properties of molten silicates at high pressures and temperatures that pervade the interior Earth. Silicates comprise most of the Earth's crust and mantle. He uses devices, such as the diamond anvil cell, to subject melts

Geochemist and director of Terrestrial Magnetism, Richard Carlson, looks at the diversity of the chemistry of the early solar nebula and the incorporation of that chemistry into the terrestrial planets. He is also interested in questions related to the origin and evolution of Earth’s continental crust.

  Most all of the chemical diversity in the universe comes from the nuclear reactions inside stars, in a process called nucleosynthesis. To answer his questions, Carlson developes novel procedures using instruments called mass spectrometers to make precise measurements of isotopes--atoms of an element with different numbers of neutrons--of Chromium (Cr), strontium (Sr), barium ( Ba