Dr. Eric Isaacs named 11th President of the Carnegie Institution for Science

By unanimous vote of the Carnegie Board of Trustees, Dr. Eric D. Isaacs has been appointed the 11th president of the Carnegie Institution for Science. Dr. Isaacs joins Carnegie from the University of Chicago and will succeed Interim Co-Presidents John Mulchaey and Yixian Zheng on July 2, 2018.

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Former-Energy Secretary and nuclear physicist Ernest Moniz received Carnegie’s inaugural Richard A. Meserve Public Service award Thursday in recognition of his “exemplary leadership and accomplishment in furthering public understanding of science.”

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Allan C. Spradling, Director Emeritus of Carnegie’s Department of Embryology, has been awarded the 23rd March of Dimes and Richard B. Johnson, Jr., MD Prize in Developmental Biology as “an outstanding scientist who has profoundly advanced the science that underlies our understanding of prenatal development and pregnancy.”

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It is commonly believed that when looking for valuable treasure, the best place to look is the attic—after all, works by Caravaggio, Van Gogh, Rembrandt, and Jackson Pollack have been discovered in attics—but not everyone thinks to look in the basement. Yet institutions like Carnegie Observatories often keep the best stuff in the basement, including "heir of Edwin Hubble" Allan Sandage’s personal collection of astronomical glass plates.

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Venkata Srinu Bhadram in Timothy Strobel’s lab at the Geophysical Laboratory (GL) will receive the ninth Postdoctoral Innovation and Excellence Award (PIE). These awards are made through nominations from the departments and are chosen by the Office of the President. The recipients are awarded a cash prize for their exceptionally creative approaches to science, strong mentoring, and contributing to the sense of campus community.

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Coral reefs are havens for marine biodiversity and underpin the economies of many coastal communities. But they are very sensitive to changes in ocean chemistry resulting from greenhouse gas emissions, as well as to pollution, warming waters, overdevelopment, and overfishing. Reefs use a mineral...
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Established in June of 2016 with a generous gift of $50,000 from Marilyn Fogel and Christopher Swarth, the Marilyn Fogel Endowed Fund for Internships will provide support for “very young budding scientists” who wish to “spend a summer getting their feet wet in research for the very first time.” ...
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Approximately half of the gene sequences of human and mouse genomes comes from so-called mobile elements—genes that jump around the genome. Much of this DNA is no longer capable of moving, but is likely “auditioning”  perhaps as a regulator of gene function or in homologous recombination, which is...
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Capital Science Evening Lectures
Carnegie Science, Carnegie Institution, Carnegie Institution for Science, MIT
Tuesday, June 12, 2018 - 6:30pm to 8:00pm

The direct measurement of gravitational waves predicted by Albert Einstein 100 years ago has opened a new field of science – gravitational wave astrophysics and astronomy. The recent discoveries...

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Science in the Neighborhood Series
Wednesday, June 13, 2018 - 6:30pm to 8:30pm

As we age, humans experience noticeable differences in our bodies—including some undesired effects on muscle, healing ability, and pain susceptibility. While aches and pains are a natural part of...

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Seminars / Conferences
Chlamydomonas image, Louisa Howard, Dartmouth College
Sunday, June 17, 2018 - 4:00pm to Thursday, June 21, 2018 - 12:15pm

18th INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON THE CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY OF CHLAMYDOMONAS

About the conference:

The meeting will have an international...

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Juna Kollmeier’s research is an unusual combination—she is as observationally-oriented theorist making predictions that can be compared to current and future observations. Her primary focus is on the emergence of structure in the universe. She combines cosmological hydrodynamic simulations and...
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Rocks, fossils, and other natural relics hold clues to ancient environments in the form of different ratios of isotopes—atomic variants of elements with the same number of protons but different numbers of neutrons. Seawater, rain water, oxygen, and ozone, for instance, all have different ratios, or...
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Josh Simon uses observations of nearby galaxies to study problems related to dark matter, chemical evolution, star formation, and the process of galaxy evolution. In one area he looks at peculiarly dark galaxies. Interestingly, some galaxies are so dark they glow with the light of just a few...
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May 21, 2018

Washington, D.C. –The DC STEM Network is one of eight groups to win the US2020’s 2018 STEM Coalition Challenge. The Challenge was a nationwide competition for communities toincrease hands-on STEM mentoring and maker-centered learning to underrepresented students. The winners were announced at the Bay Area Maker Faire in San Mateo, CA, last week. The DC STEM Network will receive a share of a $1 million award which will support further innovative, STEM-based learning for Washington, DC students.

The Network was selected from 92 applications from 35 states, representing more than 1,800 nonprofits, companies, school districts, and local government partners. The Network is a

Eric D Isaacs will be the 11th President of the Carnegie Institution for Science
May 10, 2018

Washington, D.C.—By unanimous vote of the Carnegie Board of Trustees, Dr. Eric D. Isaacs has been appointed the 11th president of the Carnegie Institution for Science. Dr. Isaacs joins Carnegie from the University of Chicago and will succeed Interim Co-Presidents John Mulchaey and Yixian Zheng on July 2, 2018.

Dr. Isaacs is currently the Executive Vice President for Research, Innovation and National Laboratories and the Robert A. Millikan Distinguished Service Professor of Physics at the University of Chicago, where he directly oversees the Argonne National Laboratory and Fermilab for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science and the university’s partnership with the Giant

May 8, 2018

Washington, DC—Former-Energy Secretary and nuclear physicist Ernest Moniz received Carnegie’s inaugural Richard A. Meserve Public Service award Thursday in recognition of his “exemplary leadership and accomplishment in furthering public understanding of science.”

Named after Carnegie's president emeritus, the honor was created to recognize science educators, policymakers, philanthropists, and outreach-oriented research scientists who make exceptional contributions to the scientific enterprise through advancing the public’s understanding of science and its role in the betterment of humankind.

“Ernest Moniz is more than just a fine physicist, he’s also a dedicated public

May 7, 2018

Baltimore, MD—Allan C. Spradling, Director Emeritus of Carnegie’s Department of Embryology, has been awarded the 23rd March of Dimes and Richard B. Johnson, Jr., MD Prize in Developmental Biology as “an outstanding scientist who has profoundly advanced the science that underlies our understanding of prenatal development and pregnancy.”

Department director and Carnegie co-interim president Yixian Zheng remarked, “Allan is a legend in developmental biology. We are all delighted by this well- deserved recognition of Allan’s groundbreaking research.”

Spradling’s decades of scientific accomplishments cover a broad spectrum of advancements. Since the early 20th century, the fruit

Carnegie Science, Carnegie Institution, Carnegie Institution for Science, MIT
June 12, 2018

The direct measurement of gravitational waves predicted by Albert Einstein 100 years ago has opened a new field of science – gravitational wave astrophysics and astronomy. The recent discoveries and the prospects for the new field will be presented.

Dr. Rainer Weiss: Nobel Laureate in Physics & Kavli Prize Laureate in Astrophysics; Emeritus Professor of Physics, MIT, on behalf of the LIGO Scientific Collaboration

#GravitationalWaves

Co-hosted by the Carnegie Institution for Science with The Kavli Foundation, the Royal Embassy of Norway, and the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters. The Kavli Prize is a partnership between The Norwegian Academy of Science and

June 13, 2018

As we age, humans experience noticeable differences in our bodies—including some undesired effects on muscle, healing ability, and pain susceptibility. While aches and pains are a natural part of growing older, there is much to learn about the aging human bodyby studying other organisms and their path through life. Two preeminent biologists will present research on aging and regeneration, and how their work advances our understanding of muscle degeneration, cancer, and other phenomena that come with age.

 

To Solve Old Problems, Research New Organisms:

Nature is wonderfully abundant, diverse, and mysterious—but biological research today tends to focus on just a few

Chlamydomonas image, Louisa Howard, Dartmouth College
June 17, 2018

18th INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON THE CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY OF CHLAMYDOMONAS

About the conference:

The meeting will have an international attendance, a strong interdisciplinary orientation, touch on may areas of biology, and foster extensive collaborations among researchers in the field. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has become a sophisticated model system relevant to studies of biological processes and has been referred to as the ‘green yeast.’ This organism is being used to examine flagella structure and function, chloroplast biogenesis, structure-function of the photosynthetic apparatus (including carbon metabolism and electron transport), photoperception and phototaxis

The Carnegie Hubble program is an ongoing comprehensive effort that has a goal of determining the Hubble constant, the expansion rate of the universe,  to a systematic accuracy of 2%. As part of this program, astronomers are obtaining data at the 3.6 micron wavelength using the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) on Spitzer Space Telescope. The team has demonstrated that the mid-infrared period-luminosity relation for Cepheids, variable stars used to determine distances and the rate of the expansion,  at 3.6 microns is the most accurate means of measuring Cepheid distances to date. At 3.6 microns, it is possible to minimize the known remaining systematic uncertainties in the Cepheid

Coral reefs are havens for marine biodiversity and underpin the economies of many coastal communities. But they are very sensitive to changes in ocean chemistry resulting from greenhouse gas emissions, as well as to pollution, warming waters, overdevelopment, and overfishing. Reefs use a mineral called aragonite, a naturally occurring form of calcium carbonate, CaCO3, to make their skeletons.  When carbon dioxide, CO2, from the atmosphere is absorbed by the ocean, it forms carbonic acid—the same stuff that makes soda fizz--making the ocean more acidic and thus more difficult for many marine organisms to grow their shells and skeletons and threatening coral reefs globally.

Ken

Fifty years ago, Americans led the world in math and science, claiming some of the most important inventions and technological breakthroughs of the 20th century.  Today, American 15-year-olds rank 25th in math compared to their peers worldwide.  Math ƒor America DC strives to reclaim America’s reputation for scientific greatness by recruiting and supporting the very best secondary education math teachers.

Here in Washington DC, the majority of secondary school students are not math proficient.  Only about two thirds of secondary school math teachers are fully certified.Our goals follow:

Recruit candidates with strong math knowledge and teaching aptitude, which enhances the

The Geophysical Laboratory has made important advances in the growth of diamond by chemical vapor deposition (CVD).  Methods have been developed to produce single-crystal diamond at low pressure having a broad range of properties.

Joe Berry has been a Carnegie investigator since 1972. He has developed powerful tools to measure local and regional exchanges of carbon over spaces of up to thousands of square miles. He uses information at the plant scale to extrapolate the carbon balance at regional and continental scales.

According to ISI's Web of Science, two of Joe Berry's papers passed extremely high, rarefied citation milestones. The 1980  paper “A biochemical model of photosynthetic CO2 assimilation in leaves of C3 species,” has had over 1,500th citations. His 1982 paper “On the relationship between carbon isotope discrimination and the intercellular carbon dioxide concentration in leaves” passed its 1,

For three decades, Chris Field has pioneered novel approaches to ecosystem research to understand climate and environmental changes. He is the founding director of the Carnegie Institution’s Department of Global Ecology on the Stanford University campus—home to a small, but remarkably productive team of researchers who investigate the basics of climate change. Field has authored more than 200 scientific publications and is cochair of the U. N.'s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Working Group 2. The IPCC Fourth Assessment, for which Field was a coordinating author, was published in 2007. He was coeditor of the March 2012 IPCC Special Report on Managing the Risks of Extreme

Timothy Strobel subjects materials to high-pressures to understand chemical processes  and interactions, and to create new, advanced energy-related materials.

For instance, silicon is the second most abundant element in the Earth’s crust and a mainstay of the electronics industry. But normal silicon is not optimal for solar energy. In its conventional crystalline form, silicon is relatively inefficient at absorbing the wavelengths most prevalent in sunlight.  Strobel made a discovery that may turn things around.  Using the high-pressure techniques pioneered at Carnegie, he created a novel form of silicon with its atoms arranged in a cage-like structure. Unlike normal silicon, this

John Mulchaey, director of the Observatories, serves as co-interim president of Carnegie as of January 1, 2018. He investigates groups and clusters of galaxies, elliptical galaxies, dark matter—the invisible material that makes up most of the universe—active galaxies and black holes. He is also a scientific editor for The Astrophysical Journal and is actively involved in public outreach and education.

Most galaxies including our own Milky Way, exist in collections known as groups, which are the most common galaxy systems and are important laboratories for studying galaxy formation and evolution. Mulchaey studies galaxy groups to understand the processes that affect most galaxies