Mark Phillips is the Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) Director Emeritus. From 2006 to 2017 Phillips served as the Associate Director for Magellan, and from 2014 to 2017 he was the interim LCO Director. He is a world-renowned supernova expert. Most stars die quietly by cooling down and “turning off” when they have exhausted their nuclear fuel. But, a few stars end in a gigantic thermonuclear explosion known as a supernova. These objects remain extremely bright for a few weeks, sometimes outshining the galaxies in which they reside. Their extreme brightness at maximum makes them potentially powerful “standard candles”—baselines for probing distances, geometry, and expansion of the universe.

Type Ia supernovae are especially attractive. Thought to be the complete thermonuclear disruption of a small, very dense stellar remnant called a white dwarf, they are highly uniform. And because of their immense luminosity at maximum light (up to 10 billion times that of the Sun), they can be observed at great distances. Phillips wants to understand the role they have in the evolution of the universe, and to determine how they can be used as standard candles for measuring distance.

Phillips has shown that Type Ia supernovae can be used as standard candles because of a tight correlation between the rate of decline from maximum light and peak luminosity. Phillips and collaborators have extended their supernovae observations to the infrared and found that Type Ia supernovae exhibit a much smaller range of luminosities at these wavelengths, making them nearly perfect standard candles. Particularly important is that in infrared the absorption of the supernova light due to dust is negligible.

Phillip joined a two-part, 5-year project called the Carnegie Supernova Program (CSP). The team is obtaining light curves—how light varies over time—of some 100 nearby Type Ia supernovae in the optical and infrared. This sample will provide a comparison for the second component of the project—near-infrared observations of about 50 very distant—known as high-redshift (0.3 < z < 0.7) —Type Ia supernovae. The goal is to measure the expansion history of the universe at different distances for a new measurement of the acceleration of the universe, which should provide clues to the nature of the mysterious dark energy that is driving the acceleration.

Phillips received an A.B. from San Diego State University and a Ph.D. in astronomy from UC-Santa Cruz. After graduate school, he was a postdoctoral associate at both Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO), and the Anglo-Australian Observatory. He then moved back to Chile in 1982 to become a staff astronomer at CTIO. He was later director of the CTIO  National Optical Astronomy Observatory, before joining Carnegie  in 1998.  For more see http://obs.carnegiescience.edu/users/mmp

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The Magellan Telescopes at Carnegie's Las Campanas Observatory in Chile
September 6, 2022

Washington, DC— An anonymous bequest of $34.8 million will enable Carnegie to continue to play a leading role advancing the frontiers of astronomy and astrophysics. The largest gift to the Institution since it was founded by Andrew Carnegie, this new fund will support staff and instrumentation at the Carnegie Observatories.

“Since George Ellery Hale built the first telescope on Mount Wilson, Carnegie has played a forefront role in some of the most important astronomical discoveries of the modern era,” said Carnegie President Eric D. Isaacs. “This transformative gift will empower new generations of Carnegie astronomers to reveal the physics that underpins

Artist's concept of the Giant Magellan Telescope courtesy of GMTO
August 2, 2022
Washington, DC—A Carnegie-led effort secured $205 million toward the completion of the next-generation Giant Magellan Telescope, which is currently being built at our Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. When completed, the GMT will enable breakthrough astronomy—from revealing the fundamental physics underpinning the cosmos to advancing our ability to search for life on distant worlds.

Last November, the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine ranked the GMT as a top strategic priority, recommending an injection of federal support to complete its construction and bring about a new era in astronomy. The endorsement was part of the academies’ review of the

Artist's conception of JWST. Credit: NASA GSFC/CIL/Adriana Manrique Gutierrez
July 24, 2022

Pasadena, CA— The first of six projects led by Carnegie-affiliated astronomers will, for the next three days, use the James Webb Space Telescope to make some of the most-accurate measurements ever taken of the chemistry of very early galaxies—studying light that traveled 10 billion years to reach us.

Carnegie’s Gwen Rudie and Allison Strom, formerly a Carnegie-Princeton Postdoctoral Fellow, now a Northwestern professor, are heading up the CECILIA project, which will take extremely accurate measurements from a carefully selected set of ancient galaxies in order to understand their compositions and chart the remarkable growth that they experienced in the universe

June 28, 2022

Washington, DC—The violent event that likely preceded our Solar System’s formation holds the solution to a longstanding meteorite mystery, says new work from Carnegie’s Alan Boss published in The Astrophysical Journal.

The raw material from which our Solar System was constructed was dispersed when the shock wave from an exploding supernova injected material into a cloud of dust and gas, causing it to collapse in on itself. In the aftermath of this event, most of the injected matter was gravitationally drawn into the center of the whirlwind, where the intense buildup of pressure enabled nuclear fusion to commence, and the Sun was born. The young star was

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The fund supports a postdoctoral fellowship in astronomy that rotates between the Carnegie Science departments of Terrestrial Magnetism in Washington, D.C., and the Observatories in Pasadena California. 

The Earthbound Planet Search Program has discovered hundreds of planets orbiting nearby stars using telescopes at Lick Observatory, Keck Observatory, the Anglo-Australian Observatory, Carnegie's Las Campanas Observatory, and the ESO Paranal Observatory.  Our multi-national team has been collecting data for 30 years, using the Precision Doppler technique.  Highlights of this program include the detection of five of the first six exoplanets, the first eccentric planet, the first multiple planet system, the first sub-Saturn mass planet, the first sub-Neptune mass planet, the first terrestrial mass planet, and the first transit planet.Over the course of 30 years we have

The Giant Magellan Telescope will be one member of the next class of super giant earth-based telescopes that promises to revolutionize our view and understanding of the universe. It will be constructed in the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. Commissioning of the telescope is scheduled to begin in 2021.

The GMT has a unique design that offers several advantages. It is a segmented mirror telescope that employs seven of today’s largest stiff monolith mirrors as segments. Six off-axis 8.4 meter or 27-foot segments surround a central on-axis segment, forming a single optical surface 24.5 meters, or 80 feet, in diameter with a total collecting area of 368 square meters. The GMT

Along with Alycia Weinberger and Ian Thompson, Alan Boss has been running the Carnegie Astrometric Planet Search (CAPS) program, which searches for extrasolar planets by the astrometric method, where the planet's presence is detected indirectly through the wobble of the host star around the center of mass of the system. With over eight years of CAPSCam data, they are beginning to see likely true astrometric wobbles beginning to appear. The CAPSCam planet search effort is on the verge of yielding a harvest of astrometrically discovered planets, as well as accurate parallactic distances to many young stars and M dwarfs. For more see  http://instrumentation.obs.carnegiescience.edu/

Ana Bonaca is Staff Member at Carnegie Observatories. Her specialty is stellar dynamics and her research aims to uncover the structure and evolution of our galaxy, the Milky Way, especially the dark matter halo that surrounds it. In her research, she uses space- and ground-based telescopes to measure the motions of stars, and constructs numerical experiments to discover how dark matter affected them.

She arrived in September 2021 from Harvard University where she held a prestigious Institute for Theory and Computation Fellowship. 

Bonaca studies how the uneven pull of our galaxy’s gravity affects objects called globular clusters—spheres made up of a million

Peter Gao's research interests include planetary atmospheres; exoplanet characterization; planet formation and evolution; atmosphere-surface-interior interactions; astrobiology; habitability; biosignatures; numerical modeling.

His arrival in September 2021 continued Carnegie's longstanding tradition excellence in exoplanet discovery and research, which is crucial as the field prepares for an onslaught of new data about exoplanetary atmospheres when the next generation of telescopes come online.

Gao has been a part of several exploratory teams that investigated sulfuric acid clouds on Venus, methane on Mars, and the atmospheric hazes of Pluto. He also

Anne Pommier's research is dedicated to understanding how terrestrial planets work, especially the role of silicate and metallic melts in planetary interiors, from the scale of volcanic magma reservoirs to core-scale and planetary-scale processes.

She joined Carnegie in July 2021 from U.C. San Diego’s Scripps Institution of Oceanography, where she investigated the evolution and structure of planetary interiors, including our own Earth and its Moon, as well as Mars, Mercury, and the moon Ganymede.

Pommier’s experimental petrology and mineral physics work are an excellent addition to Carnegie’s longstanding leadership in lab-based mimicry of the

Johanna Teske became the first new staff member to join Carnegie’s newly named Earth and Planets Laboratory (EPL) in Washington, D.C., on September 1, 2020. She has been a NASA Hubble Fellow at the Carnegie Observatories in Pasadena, CA, since 2018. From 2014 to 2017 she was the Carnegie Origins Postdoctoral Fellow—a joint position between Carnegie’s Department of Terrestrial Magnetism (now part of EPL) and the Carnegie Observatories.

Teske is interested in the diversity in exoplanet compositions and the origins of that diversity. She uses observations to estimate exoplanet interior and atmospheric compositions, and the chemical environments of their formation