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Lifetime Giving Societies

 

The Carnegie Founders Society

Andrew Carnegie, the founder of the Carnegie Institution, established it with a gift of $10 million. Although he ultimately gave a total of $22 million to the institution. His initial $10 million gift represents a special amount. Thus, individuals, including those who have directed contributions from private foundations and donor-advised funds, who support Carnegie with lifetime contributions of $10 million or more are recognized as members of the Carnegie Founders Society.

 

The Edwin Hubble Society 

The most famous astronomer of the 20th century, Edwin Hubble, was a Carnegie astronomer.  His observations that the universe is vastly larger than we thought, and that it is expanding, shattered our old concept of cosmology. Science often requires years of work before major discoveries like his can be made. The Edwin Hubble Society honors those whose lifetime contributions have helped the institution to foster such long-term, paradigm-changing research by recognizing those who have contributed between $1,000,000 and $9,999,999, as well as those individuals who have directed contributions to the Carnegie Institution at that level from private foundations and donor-advised funds.

 

The Vannevar Bush Society

Vannevar Bush, the renowned leader of American scientific research of his time, served as Carnegie’s president from 1939 to 1955. Bush believed in the power of private organizations and the conviction that it is good for man to know. The Vannevar Bush Society recognizes individuals who have made lifetime contributions of between $100,000 to $999,999, as well as those individuals who have directed contributions to the Carnegie Institution at that level from private foundations and donor-advised funds.

Other Giving Societies

 

The Second Century Legacy Society

The Carnegie Institution is now in its second century of supporting world-class scientific research and discovery. The Second Century Legacy Society recognizes individuals who have remembered or intend to remember the Carnegie Institution in their estate plans and those who have supported the institution through other forms of planned giving.

 

The Barbara McClintock Society

An icon of Carnegie science, Barbara McClintock was a Carnegie plant biologist from 1943 until her retirement. She was a giant in the field of maize genetics and received the 1983 Nobel Prize in Physiology/Medicine for her work on patterns of genetic inheritance. She was the first woman to win an unshared Nobel Prize in this category. To sustain researchers like McClintock, annual contributions to the Carnegie Institution are essential. The McClintock Society thus recognizes generous individuals who contribute $10,000 or more in a fiscal year, as well as those individuals who have directed contributions to the Carnegie Institution at that level from private foundations and donor-advised funds.