Dr. Matthew P. Scott joins the Carnegie Institution for Science as its 10th president September 1, 2014. Scott was Professor of Developmental Biology, Genetics, Bioengineering, and Biology at the Stanford University School of Medicine. He spent nearly 24 years at Stanford. The Carnegie board of trustees announced his appointment in May.

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Eating meat contributes to climate change, due to greenhouse gasses emitted by livestock. New research finds that livestock emissions are on the rise and that beef cattle are responsible for far more greenhouse gas emissions than other types of animals. 

Everyone’s heard of the birds and the bees. But that old expression leaves out the flowers that are being fertilized. The fertilization process for flowering plants is particularly complex and requires extensive communication between the male and female reproductive cells. New research from an international team reports discoveries in the chemical signaling process that guides flowering plant fertilization.

Astronomers have discovered an extremely cool object that could have a particularly diverse history—although it is now as cool as a planet, it may have spent much of its youth as hot as a star. The current temperature of the object is intermediate between that of the Earth and of Venus. However, the object shows evidence implying that a potentially large change in temperature has taken place. In the past this object would have been as hot as a star for many millions of years.

Molybdenum disulfide is a compound often used in dry lubricants and in petroleum refining. Its semiconducting ability and similarity to the carbon-based graphene makes molybdenum disulfide of interest to scientists as a possible candidate for use in the manufacture of electronics, particularly photoelectronics. New work reveals that molybdenum disulfide becomes metallic under intense pressure. 

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