News

Embryology

Embryology
Monday, September 8, 2014

The General Motors Corporation is presenting a $5,000.00 award to Carnegie’s BioEYES K-12 educational program on September 11, 2014, to deliver a two-week environmental curriculum, Your Watershed, Your Backyard. The event will start at 11: 45 AM, at GM’s Baltimore Operations, 10301 Philadelphia Rd., White March, MD.

Geophysical Laboratory

Geophysical Laboratory
Thursday, September 25, 2014

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A team has, for the first time, discovered how to produce ultra-thin "diamond nanothreads" that promise extraordinary properties, including strength and stiffness greater than that of today's strongest nanotubes and polymer fibers. Such exceedingly strong, stiff, and light materials have an array of potential applications, everything from more-fuel efficient vehicles or even the science fictional-sounding proposal for a “space elevator.” 

Global Ecology

Global Ecology
Wednesday, September 17, 2014

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A team of researchers working on a Carnegie expedition in Australia’s Great Barrier Reef has documented that coral growth rates have plummeted 40 percent since the mid-1970s. The scientists suggest that ocean acidification may be playing an important role in this perilous slowdown. 

Observatories

Observatories
Wednesday, September 10, 2014

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Quasars are supermassive black holes that live at the center of distant massive galaxies. They shine as the most luminous beacons in the sky across the entire electromagnetic spectrum by rapidly accreting matter into their gravitationally inescapable centers. New work from Carnegie solves a quasar mystery that astronomers have been puzzling over for 20 years. It shows that most observed quasar phenomena can be unified with two simple quantities: one that describes how efficiently the hole is being fed, and the other that reflects the viewing orientation of the astronomer. 

Plant Biology

Plant Biology
Wednesday, September 3, 2014

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New work has for the first time elucidated the atomic structures of the bacterial prototype of sugar transporters, termed “SWEET” transporters, found in plants and humans. These bacterial sugar transporters are called SemiSWEETs, because they are just half the size of the human and plant ones. The findings have potential practical applications for improving crop yields as well as for addressing human diseases such as diabetes. 

Terrestrial Magnetism

Department of Terrestrial Magnetism
Thursday, September 25, 2014

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Water was crucial to the rise of life on Earth and is also important to evaluating the possibility of life on other planets. Identifying the original source of Earth’s water is key to understanding how life-fostering environments come into being and how likely they are to be found elsewhere. New work found that much of our Solar System’s water likely originated as ices that formed in interstellar space.