News

Embryology

Embryology
Thursday, May 29, 2014

Video
A woman’s supply of eggs is a precious commodity because only a few hundred mature eggs can be produced throughout her lifetime and each must be as free as possible from genetic damage. Part of egg production involves a winnowing of the egg supply during fetal development, childhood and into adulthood down from a large starting pool. New research offers fresh insights into the earliest stages of egg selection, which may have broad implications for women’s health and fertility. 

Geophysical Laboratory

Geophysical Laboratory
Thursday, July 31, 2014

Molybdenum disulfide is a compound often used in dry lubricants and in petroleum refining. Its semiconducting ability and similarity to the carbon-based graphene makes molybdenum disulfide of interest to scientists as a possible candidate for use in the manufacture of electronics, particularly photoelectronics. New work reveals that molybdenum disulfide becomes metallic under intense pressure. 

Global Ecology

Global Ecology
Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Today a team, led by Greg Asner,  unveiled the first high-resolution map of the carbon stocks stored on land throughout the entire country of Perú. The new and improved methodology used to make the map marks a sea change for future market-based carbon economies. The new carbon map also reveals Perú’s extremely high ecological diversity and it provides the critical input to studies of deforestation and forest degradation for conservation, land use, and enforcement purposes.

Observatories

Observatories
Thursday, August 14, 2014

Wendy Freedman, the Crawford H. Greenewalt Director of the Carnegie Observatories and chair of the Giant Magellan Telescope Organization has accepted a position as a University Professor of Astronomy & Astrophysics at the University of Chicago, departing Carnegie September 1, 2014. Associate Director for Academic Affairs at the Observatories, John Mulchaey, will take over then as acting director.

Plant Biology

Plant Biology
Monday, June 9, 2014

Audio
Soil is a microscopic maze of nooks and crannies that hosts a wide array of life. Plants explore this environment by developing a complex branched network of roots that tap into scarce resources such as water and nutrients. How roots sense which regions of soil contain water and what effect this moisture has on the architecture of the root system has been unclear until now. New research focuses on how physical properties of a root’s local environment control root branching and through which developmental pathways these signals act.

Terrestrial Magnetism

Department of Terrestrial Magnetism
Tuesday, June 3, 2014

Audio
An international team of astronomers, including five Carnegie scientists, reports the discovery of two new planets orbiting a very old star that is near to our own Sun. One of these planets orbits the star at the right distance to allow liquid water to exist on its surface, a key ingredient to support life.