DC Stem Network

The DC STEM Network unites community partners to help inspire and prepare all DC youth to succeed, lead, and innovate in STEM fields and beyond. The Network connects educators, industry experts, community organizations, and colleges to support STEM learning across the city. The Network was formed in October 2014 through a partnership between Carnegie Science’s Carnegie Academy for Science Education and the DC Office of the State Superintendent of Education.  Over 200 community partners have already engaged in the effort to enhance STEM learning opportunities for DC students and teachers within the classroom, outside of the classroom and in the workplace.

This past year, the Network has:

  • Launched a centralized website to provide community access to STEM resources, events, and learning opportunities in DC as well as to connect educators with STEM professionals as mentors and volunteers.
  • Recruited and sustained 7 working groups that designed and administered 4 landscape surveys to determine the current status of STEM learning opportunities across the city in several priority areas: within schools, out-of-school time, mentoring and volunteering, teacher professional development, and work-based learning.
  •  Convened a STEM Summit for more than 250 STEM educators, professionals, and community partners to explore the results of the landscape surveys and begin to build partnerships for DC's STEM-related priority career sector.
  • Trained a cohort of 11 STEM Teacher Leaders to become STEM Ambassadors. These Ambassadors will provide professional development, cultivate partnerships, and bring STEM resources to their schools and community.

Moving forward, the Network and working groups are creating common measures for high-quality STEM, collaborating with schools to improve STEM offerings, increasing the number and quality of professional development opportunities for educators, and managing the DC STEM Fair.

To get involved, please contact us at info@dcstemnetwork.org or visit www.dcstemnetwork.org.  

 

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May 21, 2018

Washington, D.C. –The DC STEM Network is one of eight groups to win the US2020’s 2018 STEM Coalition Challenge. The Challenge was a nationwide competition for communities toincrease hands-on STEM mentoring and maker-centered learning to underrepresented students. The winners were announced at the Bay Area Maker Faire in San Mateo, CA, last week. The DC STEM Network will receive a share of a $1 million award which will support further innovative, STEM-based learning for Washington, DC students.

The Network was selected from 92 applications from 35 states, representing more than 1,800 nonprofits, companies, school districts, and local government partners. The Network is a

April 23, 2018

Washington, DC — On Saturday, March 17, middle and high school students in the nation’s capital showed off their science and math skills in a full-day celebration of STEM education and innovation at Ron Brown College Preparatory High School. More than 100 local students participated in the 2018 DC STEM Fair, where they presented their own science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) projects to a group of 80 volunteer judges, including representatives from local universities, STEM professional organizations, research institutions, and STEM employer groups.

Three DC high school students were selected as grand prize winners of the DC STEM Fair’s Senior Division. For the first

January 16, 2018

WASHINGTON, D.C. – US2020, a  nationwide network of more than 350 organizations to advance the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) fields, chose the DC STEM Network as one of 15 finalists for the STEM Coalition Challenge.  Ninety-two partner networks, working to advance STEM mentoring and learning to underrepresented students, competed. The finalists will compete for $1-million in resources to implement their innovative approaches to STEM teaching and learning.  

The DC STEM Network is a collaboration between the Carnegie Science’s education arm, Carnegie Academy for Science Education (CASE) and the DC Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE). The

October 3, 2017

Washington, DC—Marlena L. Jones, Acting Director of Carnegie Academy for Science Education (CASE) and the DC STEM Network has been accepted as one of 22 fellows in the inaugural class of LEAD STEM, a new national leadership development experience designed to empower and arm individuals with high level skills to shape the future of STEM education in the U.S. Fellows are meeting in person for the first time today in Kansas City, MO as part of the STEM Learning Ecosystems National Community of Practice Convening.

Carnegie Science has been committed to hands-on science and STEM education in Washington, DC, for almost three decades through CASE programs. In 2014, CASE partnered with

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Carnegie Academy for Science Education

Scientific literacy is now recognized to be crucial for our nation's progress in the 21st century.

The Carnegie Institution, a pre-eminent basic research organization, has fostered the development of scientific knowledge since the early 20th century. For many years, this meant the training of graduate students and postdoctoral fellows in the Institution's laboratories, located in Washington, DC and around the country.

In 1989, Maxine Singer, then president of Carnegie, founded First Light, a Saturday science school for children. This was the start of the Carnegie Academy for Science Education (CASE) whose goal is to encourage interest in science among school children and

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Nick Konidaris is a staff scientist at the Carnegie Observatories and Instrument Lead for the SDSS-V Local Volume Mapper (LVM). He works on a broad range of new optical instrumentation projects in astronomy and remote sensing. Nick's projects range from experimental to large workhorse facilities. On the experimental side, he recently began working on a new development platform for the 40-inch Swope telescope at Carnegie's Las Campanas Observatory that will be used to explore and understand the explosive universe.

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