Seventy-five years ago, Carnegie scientist Harry Wells predicted a massive geomagnetic storm two days in advance. It disrupted electrical power and radio communication. Read about it in ESO's "The...
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The results from a suite of environmental mercury studies done by the Carnegie Amazon Mercury Project (CAMEP) was used by the Peruvian government for the decision to announce this state of emergency...
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The results from a suite of environmental mercury studies done by the Carnegie Amazon Mercury Project (CAMEP) was used by the Peruvian government for the decision to announce this state of emergency...
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How big a role does ocean acidification play in the sickly state of many coral reefs? Science magazine reports on a new study from Ken Caldeira and Rebecca Albright that borrows from a common after-...
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USA Today reports on a first-of-its-kind experiment led by Rebecca Albright and  Ken Caldeira that found ocean acidification caused by global warming is already slowing growth of the world’s coral...
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Take a tour with Cynthia Hunt through eight foundational images from the Carnegie Observatories' plate collection in Nautilus magazine. More
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"If drought conditions continue or reoccur, even with temporary reprieves such as El Niño, we predict substantial future forest change," Greg Asner says in The Huffington Post.  More
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Planet Labs contributes an essay to Medium about Greg Asner and the Carnegie Airborne Observatory using LiDAR and satellite imagery to map the California drought, calls the CAO "a fire-fighter of a...
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"What is most astonishing about rare minerals is that the processes that ultimately forms most of them comes from biology," Bob Hazen tells the Los Angeles Times. "As life changes near the surface of...
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The world’s 2500 rarest minerals have now been categorised for the first time, revealing intriguing implications. Most have been formed in processes directly or indirectly related to living organisms...
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Jackie Faherty talks to Runner's World about spotting Mercury, Venus, Mars, Saturn, and Jupiter during a single early morning run. More 
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Through late February, five planets will align in early morning sky, and can be seen unaided. Jackie Faherty tells NPR it is like the planetary Academy Awards. More
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“It was probably the runt of the family,” Scott Sheppard tells the L.A. Times of the theorized ninth planet. Sheppard's 2014 co-discovery of the planetoid 2012 VP113, popularly nicknamed "Biden," ...
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"Estimates range as high as there being one habitable Earth-like planet for every star in our galaxy. As someone who has lived through the ups and downs of the history of the field of planet...
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"Supernovae shape the universe we live in and there are still many unanswered questions about these explosions, even for the common ones," Ben Shappee tells The Washington Post about the most-...
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NPR covers the discovery of the most-luminous supernova by a team of astronomers, including Ben Shappee. More
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Smithsonian Magazine talks Bob Hazen about "Life's Rocky Start" the NOVA special that features his work on mineral evolution and ecology. “We see this intertwined co-evolution of the geosphere and...
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CBS Evening News covers Greg Asner and the Carnegie Airborne Observatory team's work on the impact the drought has had on California's forests. The team found that 888 million trees have seen...
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We are missing aat least 145 carbon-bearing minerals and you can help find them. Smithsonian Magazine covers the Carbon Mineral Challenge, launched by Robert Hazen and Daniel Hummer at The American...
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Dan Rather interveiws Chris Field, director of Global Ecology, about climate change. The interview was published by the Huffington Post.
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50 years after the first U.S. president was warned about climate change, it is "the defining issue of our time," Department of Global Ecology Director Chris Field told attendees. More
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Now is the perfect moment for satellites to start measuring biodiversity, Carnegie's Greg Asner tells Mongabay. “It’s the perfect storm of conditions,” he says. More
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“I started out thinking that it was all about information, and if we only got the right information to the right people, then the right things would happen,” Carnegie's Ken Caldeira tells WIRED...
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“We can’t explain these objects’ orbits from what we know about the solar system,” says Carnegie's Scott Sheppard in Science Magazine's coverage of his announcement at a meeting of the American...
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A pair of researchers have new evidence to support a link between cyclical comet showers and mass extinctions, including the one that they believe wiped out the dinosaurs 66 million years ago. NYU's ...
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Not only did our early Solar System potentially consist of five or even six giant worlds, but there may have been a large number of inner, terrestrial planets that were ejected back in the Solar...
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Solar power developers in California have been using mostly undeveloped desert lands with sensitive wildlife habitat as sites for new solar power installations. Areas that have already been developed...
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"Some of the scariest prospects from a changing clime involve conditions completely outside the range of human experience," Department of Global Ecology Director Chris Field tells the Associated...
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"I started to wonder if I could design a course that encouraged freshmen to recognize the beauty and wealth of trees on campus? Could I meld my curiosity about the trees and rejuvenate my rusty...
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The American Society for Cell Biology profiles Yixian Zheng and her recent papers on the elusive spindle matrix. "Zheng’s lab identifies new regulators in spindle assembly, all associated with the...
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The L.A. Times covers the Carnegie Airborne Observatory's assessment of California's drought: "Asner has a practiced eye for forest health, and with instruments aboard his plane that give him X-ray...
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“The system produces maps that tell us more about an ecosystem in a single airborne overpass than what might be achieved in a lifetime of work on the ground,” Greg Asner tells National Geographic in...
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Yuri Beletsky's recent image of  the lunar eclipse at  Carnegie's Las Campanas Observatory has been published by NASA as the Astronomy Picture of the Day, October 1, 2015. The total lunar eclipse...
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A unique airborne observatory measures the drought stress in California at 8 million trees per hour...more
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"Two physical realities virtually ensure that Californians will still face drought, regardless of how this El Niño unfolds," write Department of Global Ecology Director Chris Field and Stanford's ...
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Washington Post gardening columnist, Adrian Higgins, writes about the quest for the perfect tomato and this month's Capital Science Evening speaker, Harry Klee of the University of Florida...
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"It’s true that right now our fossil-fuel resources remain vast; but it’s also true that, if we keep burning through them at current rates, they’ll be gone in less time than it took for the Roman...
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“The legacy of what we’re doing over the next decades and the next centuries is really going to have a dramatic influence on this planet for many tens of thousands of years,” Ken Caldeira tells The...
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“This is humanity as a geologic force,” Ken Caldeira tells the New York Times. “We’re not a subtle influence on the climate system – we are really hitting it with a hammer.” More 
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 “It’s like going in and getting a blood test, and the doctor saying you’re OK or you’re not,” Greg Asner tells The Guardian of his Carnegie Airborne Observatory team's monitoring of drought-stricken...
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Popular Mechanics: Clyde Tombaugh still discovered the dwarf planet, but this is the latest "precovery" image to be unearthed. More
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“I think there are definitely things out there bigger than Pluto that are yet to be discovered,” Scott Sheppard talks to The Washington Post about the possibility of an undiscovered outer Solar...
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On SFGate: Carnegie's José Dinneny uses firefly proteins to light up certain plants and reveal root system behavior. More
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The ancient lunar surface once erupted with geysers of lava — and now, a team of scientists including Carnegie's Erik Hauri think they know what caused those fiery fountains. More
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Daily Mail: A shockwave from a catastrophic supernova explosion may have triggered the birth of our Solar System when it crashed into a cloud of gas. Scientists studying this process, Carnegie's Alan...
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Science Magazine talks to Alan Boss about how Jupiter and Saturn may have formed. More
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Are today’s minerals a predictable consequence of the planet’s chemical makeup? Or are they the result of chance events? What if we were to look out at the cosmos and spot another Earth-like planet—...
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Climate change could give San Francisco the climate index of San Diego and New York City the climate index of Oklahoma City, according to new research from Ken Caldeira and high school intern Yana...
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Stop burning fossil fuels now: there is no CO2 'technofix', scientists warn More
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Slate's Bad Astronomy says a photo of Orion's M43 nebula by Carnegie's Yuri Beletsky and Igor Chilingarian of the Harvard–Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics might be the deep-sky astrophoto of the...
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The Amazon rainforest might seem like a massive expanse of monotonous green. However, recent work from Carnegie's Greg Asner has found that within this monotony lies a kaleidoscope of chemicals...
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Alexander Goncharov's experiment on noble gases could give new insight into the interiors of gas giant planets says Scientific American. More
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Allan Spradling offers input to The Scientist on a paper about female Japanese rice fish producing sperm. More
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The Washington Post covers research from Ken Caldeira and Xiaochun Zhang, which compares warming from fossil fuel combustion with warming caused by the carbon dioxide released by the burning process...
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Greg Asner is interviewed for American Scientist's Sightings column, discusses the logistics and benefits of research using remote sensing technology. More
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The ocean on Saturn's moon Enceladus may have a potential energy source to support life, according to research from a team led by Christopher Glein. More
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Two nights ago, for the first time in history, astronomers from University of Arizona and Carnegie's Yuri Beletsky at Las Campanas Observatory used the Clay Magellan telescope together with Magellan...
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Mongabay covers the launch of Greg Asner's third-generation Carnegie Airborne Observatory, and the possiblity that he'll tackle mapping in drought-stricken California and Malaysian Borneo. More
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Carnegie's Larry Nittler, deputy principal investigator for the MESSENGER mission, talks to BBC News about its crash into Mercury and all we've learned from the mission. More
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Artificially manipulating Arctic climate by 'whitening' the ocean's surface to reflect sunlight back into space will fail, Carnegie's Ken Caldeira tells The Independent. More
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Mitotic proteins take on editorial duties in this writeup of new work from Yixian Zheng's lab in The Journal of Cell Biology. More 
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Carnegie's John Mulchaey talks to NPR's Morning Edition about Edwin Hubble's work at the Mount Wilson Obeservatory and his famous Andromeda plates. Read more
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Ken Caldeira warns against the use of geoengineering, calls research into it an "act of desperation on the part of scientists." Read more
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"Then about a decade ago, Carlson found room for doubt, after comparing Earth rocks and space rocks using better instruments..." Read More  
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Research from Carnegie's William Anderegg (now at Princeton University), Joseph Berry, and Christopher Field is featured in this public radio piece. 
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Ken Caldeira discusses geoengineering with Mother Jones: "We Could Stop Global Warming With This Fix—But It's Probably a Terrible Idea."
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Read the Washington Post story on California solar power potential. March 3-17-15
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PBS Interviews Chris Field at the Peru Climate Talks (at 6:30) 12-11-14
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Read the Newsweek article that describes how Greg Asner created the first high-resolution carbon maps of the entire country of Peru
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Carnegie Institution Observatories researchers are featured in Astronomy Magazine discussing dark matter and what supernovae may tell us about the fate of the universe.
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