Washington, D.C.—Earth's magnetic field is generated by the motion of liquid iron in the planet's core. This “geodynamo” occasionally reverses its polarity—the magnetic north and south poles swap...
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Washington, D.C.—Matthew Sieber, a postdoctoral fellow at the Department of Embryology, has been honored for his extraordinary accomplishments, through a new program that recognizes exceptional...
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Baltimore, MD— Reproduction is highly dependent on diet and the ability to use nutrients to grow and generate energy. This is clearly seen in women, who must provide all the nutritional building...
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Jackie Faherty talks to Runner's World about spotting Mercury, Venus, Mars, Saturn, and Jupiter during a single early morning run. More 
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“It was probably the runt of the family,” Scott Sheppard tells the L.A. Times of the theorized ninth planet. Sheppard's 2014 co-discovery of the planetoid 2012 VP113, popularly nicknamed "Biden," ...
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Through late February, five planets will align in early morning sky, and can be seen unaided. Jackie Faherty tells NPR it is like the planetary Academy Awards. More
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"Estimates range as high as there being one habitable Earth-like planet for every star in our galaxy. As someone who has lived through the ups and downs of the history of the field of planet...
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"Supernovae shape the universe we live in and there are still many unanswered questions about these explosions, even for the common ones," Ben Shappee tells The Washington Post about the most-...
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NPR covers the discovery of the most-luminous supernova by a team of astronomers, including Ben Shappee. More
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Pasadena, CA—A team of astronomers, including Carnegie’s Benjamin Shappee, Nidia Morrell, and Ian Thompson, has discovered the most-luminous supernova ever observed, called ASAS-SN-15lh. Their...
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Smithsonian Magazine talks Bob Hazen about "Life's Rocky Start" the NOVA special that features his work on mineral evolution and ecology. “We see this intertwined co-evolution of the geosphere and...
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Pasadena, CA— New work from a team of astronomers led by Carnegie’s Jennifer van Saders indicates that one recently developed method for determining a star’s age needs to be recalibrated for stars...
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CBS Evening News covers Greg Asner and the Carnegie Airborne Observatory team's work on the impact the drought has had on California's forests. The team found that 888 million trees have seen...
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Washington, DC—California’s forests are home to the planet’s oldest, tallest and most-massive trees. New research from Carnegie’s Greg Asner and his team reveals that up to 58 million large trees in...
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Deck the Halls Our newly renovated hall has state-of-the-art audio visual and broadcast capabilities. The restoration preserved all of its beautiful, historic aspects. Carnegie' new logo captures the...
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We are missing aat least 145 carbon-bearing minerals and you can help find them. Smithsonian Magazine covers the Carbon Mineral Challenge, launched by Robert Hazen and Daniel Hummer at The American...
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Stanford, CA—Carnegie’s Alexander Jones will receive the Tansley Medal for Excellence in Plant Science. The honor includes publishing a short review, an editorial written about his work in the...
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Washington, DC— A team made up almost entirely of current and former Carnegie scientists has discovered a highly unusual planetary system comprised of a Sun-like star, a dwarf star, and an...
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Dan Rather interveiws Chris Field, director of Global Ecology, about climate change. The interview was published by the Huffington Post.
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50 years after the first U.S. president was warned about climate change, it is "the defining issue of our time," Department of Global Ecology Director Chris Field told attendees. More
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Now is the perfect moment for satellites to start measuring biodiversity, Carnegie's Greg Asner tells Mongabay. “It’s the perfect storm of conditions,” he says. More
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“I started out thinking that it was all about information, and if we only got the right information to the right people, then the right things would happen,” Carnegie's Ken Caldeira tells WIRED...
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San Diego, CA— Ghosts are not your typical cell biology research subjects. But scientists at the Carnegie Institution for Science and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (...
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Washington, DC— As astronomers continue to find more and more planets around stars beyond our own Sun, they are trying to discover patterns and features that indicate what types of planets are likely...
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Washington, D.C.—New observations from an international geophysics team, including Carnegie’s Lara Wagner, suggest that the standard belief that the Earth’s rigid tectonic plates stay strong when...
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