Astronomy Lecture Series
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Since 2002, the Carnegie Observatories has organized an annual series of four public lectures on current astronomical topics.  These lectures are given by staff astronomers and postdoctoral researchers from the Carnegie Observatories, as well as from other prominent astronomy research institutions.  The lectures are geared to the general public and are free, and last for approximately one hour, followed by a brief question and answer period. All four lectures are held at Rothenberg Hall at The Huntington Library in San Marino, California. There is ample free parking on site. Doors open at 7:00 PM, and all lectures start at 7:30 PM. Light refreshments will be served before each lecture. 
 
Admission is free, however due to limited space, tickets are required for admission. Free tickets for the Series will be available starting on Wednesday, February 15, on the Carnegie Observatories' and the Huntington's websites: obs.carnegiescience.edu and www.huntington.org.   

 

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