Contact Zhi-Yong Wang at Carnegie's Department of Plant Biology, 650-325-1521 ext. 205, or via e-mail at zywang24@stanford.edu

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Contact Carnegie Observatories’ Edo Berger at 626-304-0251, or eberger@ociw.edu

 

Pasadena, CA –...

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Contact Alan Boss at 202-478-8858, or boss@dtm.ciw.edu

 

Washington, D.C. – Scientists now believe that the...

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Contact Carnegie’s Dr. Gregory Asner, at 650-380-2828, gpa@stanford.edu,

or Stanford’s Peter Vitousek, at vitousek@stanford.edu

...
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Contact: Ivo Labbé at the Carnegie Observatories, ivo@ociw.edu, or 626-304-0265;

Jiasheng Huang at Harvard-Smithsonian Center for...

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Contact Sara Seager at 202-478- 8868, or seager@dtm.ciw.edu;

Tina McDowell in the Carnegie Publications office at 202-939-1120, or...

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Contact Tina McDowell@ 202-939-1120, or tmcdowell@ciw.edu

 

Carnegie molecular biologist Joseph Gall discusses the work of groundbreaking microscopists, biologists, zoologists, and geneticists with Bill Nye, "The...

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Contact Eugene Gregoryanz at 202-478-8953, e.gregoryanz@gl.ciw.edu

Or Olga Degtyareva, 202-478-8948,...

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Contact Douglas Rumble, III, Carnegie Geophysical Laboratory, 202 478- 8990, rumble@gl.ciw.edu

The paper may be viewed at this link...

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The President and Trustees of the Carnegie Institution

cordially invite you to view the

 

CARNEGIE EVENING LECTURE...

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Contact Dr. Russell Hemley at 202- 478-8951, r.hemley@gl.ciw.edu;

or Chih-Shiue Yan at 202-478-8959, c.yan@gl.ciw.edu

...
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Contact Sakiko Okumoto at 650-325-1521 x 636, sokumoto@stanford.edu;

Wolf Frommer at 650-325-1521 x 208,...

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Contacts: Robert Sanders, University of California, Berkeley: (510) 643-6998, rsanders@berkeley.edu

M. Mitchell Waldrop, NSF: (703) 292-7752,...

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Contact Maud Boyet at 202-478-8482 / boyet@dtm.ciw.edu

or Rick Carlson at 202-478-8474 / carlson@dtm.ciw.edu

...
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Contact Jung-Fu Lin at 202-478-8911, j.lin@gl.ciw.edu; Ho-kwang Mao,h.mao@gl.ciw.edu 202-321-8899;

or Wolfgang...

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Contact Marilyn Fogel 202-478-8981, m.fogel@gl.ciw.edu

 

Washington, D.C....

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Contact Jung-Fu Lin at 925-424-4157, j.lin@gl.ciw.edu; Viktor Struzhkin at 202-478-8952, v.struzhkin@gl.ciw.edu; or
Steve Jacobsen, 202-478-7975,...

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Contact Armando Gil de Paz at 626-304-0273, agpaz@ociw.edu; or
Barry Madore at 626-304-0247, bmadore@ociw.edu, orbarry@ipac.caltech.edu

...
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Contact Frances Donald 44 0 1592 643 200, fdonald@catchline.co.uk

Or Alex Barr 44 0 141 333 9585

 

Images available from Frances Donald

...
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Contact Russell Hemley at Hemley@gl.ciw.edu, 202-478-8951; or Dave Mao at Mao@gl.ciw.edu

For images, contact Tina McDowell,...

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First Minister Jack McConnell is to present entrepreneur and philanthropist Sir Tom Farmer with the philanthropic equivalent of a Nobel Prize, the Carnegie UK Trusts announced today.

Mr McConnell is one of six presenters who will attend this year’...

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Contact Leonard Garcia, NASA Goddard, 301-286-9486, garcia@mail630.gsfc.nasa.gov;
or Michelle Brooks, Carnegie’s Department of Terrestrial Magnetism at 202-478-8830;...

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Contact at Carnegie, Marilyn Fogel at 202-478-8981, email...

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Contact Carnegie’s Dr. Gregory Asner, office 650-462-1047 x202; cell 650-380-2828; e-mail gasner@globalecology.stanford.edu

...
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Carnegie Contact: Dr. Shauna Somerville; ssomerville@stanford.edu or (650) 325-1521 ext. 257

Or...

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Contact Tina McDowell at 202-939-1120, or tmcdowell@ciw.edu

or Matthew Wright at 202-939-1142,...

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Contact : Dr. Benjamin Ohlstein, 410-246-3003, or 3403, email, ohlstein@ciwemb.edu;

or Dr. Allan...

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Contact Tina McDowell at 202-939-1120, or tmcdowell@ciw.edu

 

Carnegie Institution trustee emeritus John Diebold died at the age of 79. Mr. Diebold actively served on the Carnegie board of trustees from 1975 through...

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Washington, D.C.--New theoretical work shows that gas-giant planet formation can occur around binary stars in much the same way that it occurs around single stars like the Sun. The work is presented today by Dr. Alan Boss of the Carnegie Institution’s Department of Terrestrial...

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Washington, D.C. -- On January 20, 2006, Moody’s Investors Service assigned a Aaa/VMIG1 rating to the Carnegie Institution’s Series 2006 bonds issued though the California Educational Facilities Authority. It is the highest rating that the service assigns—only 10 other not-for-...

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Stanford, CA – Scientists at the Carnegie Institution’s Department of Plant Biology have found that photosynthetic bacteria living in scalding Yellowstone hot springs have two radically different metabolic identities. As the sun goes down, these cells quit their day job of...

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Carnegie scientists breathed a sigh of relief on Sunday, January 15 when NASA’s Stardust mission landed safely with the first solid comet samples ever brought back to Earth. As members of the mission’s Preliminary Examination Team, Larry Nittler and Conel Alexander (both Department...

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Stanford, CA -- Increased carbon dioxide emissions are rapidly making the world’s oceans more acidic and, if unabated, could cause a mass extinction of marine life similar to one that occurred 65 million years ago when the dinosaurs disappeared. Ken Caldeira of the Carnegie...

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Mr. Chairman and Members of the Committee:

I am grateful for the opportunity to testify before you today.  I have appeared before this Committee many times in my former job as the NASA Associate Administrator for Space Science, and few times since.  I now appear...

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Washington, DC – Like modern day alchemists, materials scientists often turn unassuming substances into desirable ones. But instead of working metal into gold, they create strange new compounds that could make the electronic components of the future smaller, faster, and more durable...

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Washington, D.C. Today’s climate change pales in comparison with what happened as Earth gave birth to its oxygen-containing atmosphere billions of years ago. By analyzing clues contained in rocks, scientists at the Carnegie Institution’s Geophysical Laboratory have found that the...

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Washington, D.C. Rocky planets such as Earth and Mars are born when small particles smash together to form larger, planet-sized clusters in a planet-forming disk, but researchers are less sure about how gas-giant planets such as Jupiter and Saturn form. Is core accretion—the process...

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Washington, D.C. Evidence never dies in the popular TV show Cold Case. Nor do some traces of life disappear on Earth, Mars, or elsewhere. An international team of scientists,* including researchers from the Carnegie Institution’s Geophysical Laboratory, has developed techniques to...

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Washington, D.C. On Sunday, January 15, NASA’s Stardust mission landed safely with the first solid comet fragments ever brought back to Earth. Members of the mission’s Preliminary Examination Team, including several from the Carnegie Institution’s Geophysical Laboratory and...

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Washington, D.C. Since the mid-1990s a great debate has raged over whether organic compounds and tiny globules of carbonate minerals imbedded in the Martian meteorite Allan Hills 84001 were processed by living creatures from the Red Planet. The materials...

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Baltimore, MD – We are all familiar with the dangers of too much fat in our diet—increased risk of diabetes, heart disease, and obesity are just a few of the most severe consequences. But some rare metabolic diseases, such as hypolipidemia and Tangier disease, seem to work in...

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Washington, D.C.—Christine D. Smith, formerly associate vice president for Main Campus development and senior director of development for the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University, has been appointed the first chief advancement officer of the Carnegie Institution of...

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Pasadena, CA. The Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT), the first extremely large new-generation telescope to begin production, has gained a new partner—the Australian National University (ANU) http://www.anu.edu.au/. The announcement made today comes...

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Stanford, CA – Cellulose—a fibrous molecule found in all plants—is the most abundant biological material on Earth. It is also a favored target of renewable, plant-based biofuels research. Despite overwhelming interest, scientists know relatively little about how plant cells...

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Washington, DC. To truly understand some of the movement we see at the Earth’s surface, scientists have to probe deep into the interior. A region near the planet’s core, about 1,800 miles down called the core-mantle boundary, is particularly intriguing. Through novel experiments...

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Washington, DC – Like an interplanetary spaceship carrying passengers, meteorites have long been suspected of ferrying relatively young ingredients of life to our planet. Using new techniques, scientists at the Carnegie Institution’s Department of Terrestrial Magnetism have...

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Washington, DC – Nobel laureate and Carnegie trustee emeritus Charles H. Townes has received the 2006 Vannevar Bush Award from the National Science Board, the oversight body of the National Science Foundation. At the age of 90, Townes is an active researcher at the University of...

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Washington, DC – Minerals crunched by intense pressure near the Earth’s core lose much of their ability to conduct infrared light, according to a new study from the Carnegie Institution’s Geophysical Laboratory. Since infrared light contributes to the flow of heat, the result...

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Washington, D.C. Astronomers detected unusually high quantities of carbon, the basis of all terrestrial life, in an infant solar system around nearby star Beta Pictoris, 63 light-years away. “For years we’ve looked to this early forming solar system as one that might be going...

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Washington, DC. A new explanation for forming “super-Earths” suggests that they are more likely to be found orbiting red dwarf stars—the most abundant type of star—than gas giant planets like Jupiter and Saturn. The theory, by Dr. Alan Boss of the Carnegie Institution’s Department...

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Washington, DC – Three new objects locked into roughly the same orbit as Neptune—called “Trojan” asteroids—have been found by researchers from the Carnegie Institution’s Department of Terrestrial Magnetism (DTM) and the Gemini Observatory. The discovery offers evidence that Neptune...

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Washington, DC – The Carnegie Institution of Washington and the University of Massachusetts Medical School announced today that opposition in Australia to the grant of the institutions’ patent application related to the discovery of RNAi has been withdrawn. The opposition was...

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Carnegie Institution planetary-formation theorist and 1997 National Medal of Science recipient George Wetherill died from heart failure on July 19, 2006, at his Washington, D.C. home. Wetherill revolutionized our understanding of how our planets and solar system formed through his...

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Washington, DC— As part of its international scientific exchange effort, the Fulbright Senior Specialists Program has awarded Carnegie scientist Marilyn Fogel a grant to share the most up-to-date findings in the fields of astrobiology and biogeochemistry with staff and students at...

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STANFORD, CA-A team of scientists, led by Greg Asner of the Carnegie Institution’s Department of Global Ecology, has discovered an important indicator of rain forest vulnerability to clear-cutting in Brazil. Their five-year study is the first to quantify the relationship between...

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James A. Van Allen, Carnegie (DTM) alumnus and pioneering discoverer of Earth's radiation belts, has died at age 91.

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Washington, D.C.—For the first time, scientists have dated diamonds from the recently discovered diamond fields in Canada’s Northwest Territories and have found them to be the oldest precisely dated diamonds on...

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Stanford, CA—Any gardener knows that different plant species mature at different times. Scientists studying natural plant communities know this phenomenon allows species to co-exist by reducing overlap so there is less competition for...

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Washington, D.C. – Christopher Somerville, Director of the Carnegie Institution’s Department of Plant Biology, has been awarded the 2006 Balzan Prize in Plant Molecular Genetics, which he will share with his longtime collaborator,...

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The Department of Terrestrial Magnetism's Sara Seager has been named one of this year's Brilliant 10 by Popular Science.

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Baltimore, MD—The Lasker Foundation awarded Carnegie’s Joseph G. Gall the prestigious 2006 Lasker Award for Special Achievement in Medical Science. The citation recognizes that Gall is “a founder of modern cell...

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Contact: Gary Kowalczyk, Director of Administration and Finance;
(202) 939-1118 or gkowalczyk@ciw.edu

Washington, D.C. -...

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Washington, D.C. — Andrew Z. Fire, a scientist who discovered RNAi, or RNA interference while at the Carnegie Institution’s Department of Embryology, along with Craig C. Mello of the University of...

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Contact Gary Kowalczyk, 202-939-1118 or gkowalczyk@ciw.edu

See Charity Navigator details at...

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The Geophysical Laboratory director Wesley T. Huntress, Jr. has received the American Astronautical Society's William...

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Washington, D.C. – For the first time, astronomers have measured the day and night temperatures of a planet outside our solar system. The team,* which includes Sara Seager of Carnegie’s Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, revealed...

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Washington, D.C. Scientists at the Carnegie Institution and Penn State University* have discovered evidence showing that microbes...

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Washington, D.C.–Researchers have discovered an isolated, self-sustaining, bacterial community living under extreme conditions almost two miles deep beneath the surface in a South African...

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The Baltimore Sun profiles high-risk research at Carnegie Institution's Department of Embryology where...

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Pasadena, CA – Astronomers have taken amazing pictures of two of the most distant galaxies ever seen. The ultradeep images, taken at infrared...

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Washington, D.C. – Water, the only indispensable ingredient of life, is just about the most versatile stuff on Earth. Depending on its temperature we can heat our homes with it, bathe in it, and even strap on skates and glide across...

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Washington, D.C. Over the last half century, researchers have found that mineral surfaces may have played critical roles organizing, or activating, molecules that would become essential ingredients to all life—such as amino acids (the...

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Washington, D.C. - The Carnegie Institution announced today that the United States Patent Office has recently granted a patent for the work of three inventors--Russell Hemley, Ho-kwang Mao, and Chih-Shiue Yan--related to the manufacture of a hard, single-crystal diamond. The...
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Plant Biology's Shauna Somerville has been elected a 2006 Fellow by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)

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Washington, D.C. - The Carnegie Institution announced today that the Carnegie board of trustees has elected Remi Barbier, founder, president & CEO of Pain Therapeutics, Inc., to their board. Pain Therapeutics is a publicly...

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Stanford, CA - Scientists, including Ken Caldeira of the Carnegie Institution's Department of Global Ecology, have found that the Earth's global warming, 55 million years ago, may have resulted from the climate's...

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Washington, D.C. – Eleven months ago, NASA’s Stardust mission touched down in the Utah desert with the first solid comet samples ever retrieved...

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Contact: Matthew Wright at (202) 939-1142 or mwright@ciw.edu

Washington, DC – The National Academy of Sciences has awarded Carnegie president emerita Maxine F. Singer the Public Welfare Medal, the academy’s most...

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Carnegie Contact: Dr. Mark Seibert, (626) 304-0273 or mseibert@ociw.edu

 

Pasadena, CA – Certain double, or binary, star systems erupt in full-blown explosions and then flare up...

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Stanford, Calif. – Over a span of two decades, warming temperatures have caused annual losses of roughly $5 billion for major food crops, according to a new study by researchers at the Carnegie Institution and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

From 1981-2002,...

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Global Ecology director Chris Field discusses his latest work, which demonstrates that global warming has already significantly affected agriculture, in a video...

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The Lab-On-a-Chip, developed at Carnegie in collaboration with NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and Charles River Labs, has been successfully tested on the space...

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Stanford, Calif. – Planting and protecting trees—which trap and absorb carbon dioxide as they grow—can help to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. But a new study suggests that, as a way to fight global warming, the effectiveness of this strategy...

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Stanford, CA.The American Institute of Architects (AIA) announced this week that Carnegie’s Global Ecology department building is among the top 10 buildings in the country that are “examples of sustainable architecture and green design solutions that promote...

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The President and Trustees of the Carnegie Institution

cordially invite you to view the

 

CARNEGIE EVENING LECTURE

...
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Washington, DC – Paul Silver, a geophysicist at Carnegie’s Department of Terrestrial Magnetism in Washington, DC, was elected as a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences on Friday, April 27. Out of more than 1,100 nominees, 227 were elected as Fellows.

Silver’s...

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Stanford, CA – Tropical plants are able to adapt to environmental change by extracting nitrogen from a variety of sources, according to a new study that appears in the May 7 early online edition of The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

By demonstrating that not all plants...

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According to ISI's Web of Science, two of Joe Berry's papers passed extremely high, rarefied citation milestones last week.

The following 1980 paper just passed its 1,500th citation:

...

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Carnegie Contact: Dr. Christopher Field
(650) 462-1047 x201 or cfield@globalecology.stanford.edu

For a copy of the paper, please contact:
AAAS Office of Public Programs; (202) 326-6440 or...

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Contact: Russell Hemley at (202) 478-8951 or r.hemley@gl.ciw.edu;

or Ho-kwang (Dave)...

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Dr. Greg Asner of Carnegie's Department of Global Ecology discusses laser-generated topographic images in on-demand video.

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Carnegie Contact: Dr. Isamu Matsuyama
(202) 478-8863 or (matsuyama@dtm.ciw.edu)

For a copy of the paper, please contact Helen Jamison at Nature:...

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Kenneth L. Franklin, who from 1954 to 1956 was a research fellow in radio astronomy at the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, has died at 84 following heart surgery.

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The skies over Hawaii buzz with the propellers of small aircraft. Most of them ferry people among the islands, or give tourists a glimpse of inaccessible locales. But there is one among the swarm that is unlike anything else in the sky, distinguishable from the tourist planes only by a small...

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Carnegie Contact: Dr. Mark Phillips

011-56-51-207301 or (mmp@lco.cl)

 

La Serena, Chile...

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Contact Ho-kwang (Dave) Mao at 202-478- 8960, or h.mao@gl.ciw.edu

Contact Russell Hemley at 202-478-8951,or rhemley@ciw.edu

...
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Carnegie Institution Observatories researchers are featured in Astronomy Magazine discussing dark matter and what supernovae may tell us about the fate of the universe....

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August 15, 2007

Contact Dr. Mark Seibert

(626) 304-0273 or mseibert@ociw.edu

For a copy of the paper, please contact Helen Jamison at Nature: h....

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Carnegie Contact: Dr. Winslow Briggs;

(650) 325-1521 x207 or briggs@stanford.edu

For a copy of the paper, please contact:

AAAS Office of Public Programs; (202) 326-6440 or ...

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Washington DC*-- Key components of a new approach to discover life on Mars were successfully launched into space...

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The Carnegie Institution’s new look, featured on this new Web site, helps identify who we are clearly and concisely. By closely associating “Carnegie” and “science” in our new logo, our core identity is obvious in the blink of an eye. Although we have made every...

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Washington, D.C. In the first experiments able to mimic the crushing, searing conditions found in Earth’s lower mantle, and simultaneously probe tell-...

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Stanford, CA-- A team, led by researchers at the Carnegie Institution,* has found a key biochemical cycle that...

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Carnegie cell biologist Joseph G. Gall in the Department of Embryology was chosen to receive the...

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The Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) Consortium* announces that the GMT will be constructed at Cerro Las Campanas, Chile. This location was selected for its high altitude, dry climate, dark skies, and unsurpassed seeing quality, as...

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Senior trustee William T. Golden died on Sunday October 7 at the age of 97. Bill Golden was an icon of American science policy, and the Carnegie Institution was privileged to have his support and guidance for more than 35 years. Dedicated, passionate, and always involved, Bill...

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Genes of a tiny, single-celled green alga called Chlamydomonas reinhardtii may contain scores more data about the common ancestry of plants and animals than the richest paleontological dig. This work is described in an article in the October 12, 2007, issue of Science...

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Former Carnegie Academy for Science Education (CASE) director Inés Cifuentes has won this year’s Hispanic Heritage Award for Math and Science. Instituted by the White House in 1987, the Hispanic Heritage Awards are the most prestigious Hispanic honors in America...

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Carnegie scientists Chris Field and Ken Caldeira of the Department of Global Ecology are key contributors in the UN panel awarded the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize on October 12 for work on global climate change.  The International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) shares...

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Greg Asner of the Department of Global Ecology has been picked by Popular Science magazine as one of its annual “Brillant 10.” According to the magazine’s November issue, Brilliant 10 researchers “challenge what we thought it was possible to know,” and Asner “created a...
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The Norwegian Embassy brings together scientists from both sides of the Atlantic for its Annual Science Week at the Carnegie Institution in Washington, D.C. Among the topics discussed will be the science that...

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Stanford, CA -- Human activities are releasing carbon dioxide faster than ever, while the natural processes that normally slow its build up in the atmosphere appear to be weakening. These...

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Ken Caldeira, of Carnegie’s Department of Global Ecology, has an Op Ed piece about how to cool the planet in the October 24, 2007, New York Times. See ...

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The Center for the Built Environment—an organization where industry leaders and researchers cooperate to produce substantial, holistic, and far-sighted research on buildings—awarded the Department of Global Ecology building...

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Stanford, CA The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation awarded a $750,000 grant to the Carnegie Institution’s Department of Global...

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The first “State of the Carbon Cycle Report” for North America, released online this week by the U.S. Climate Change Science Program, finds the continent’s carbon budget increasingly overwhelmed by human-caused emissions. North American sources release nearly 2 billion...

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The American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT) announced today that renowned astrophysicist Vera Rubin, who confirmed the existence of dark matter,...

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Astronomers have found a new population of faint protogalaxies by taking the most sensitive spectroscopic survey ever of a time when the universe was only 15% of its...

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Pasadena CA—Typically, little M-dwarf stars—the most common type of star in the galaxy—are cold, quiet, and dim. Now a team of astronomers led by Edo Berger, a Carnegie-Princeton postdoctoral fellow, found one M-dwarf that doesn’t conform. It has an unusually active and complex...

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Chris Field is one of 25 researchers who will attend the Nobel Peace Prize ceremony and banquet on Dec. 10 in Oslo, Norway. See...

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Stanford, CA — Carbon emissions from human activities are not just heating up the globe, they are changing the ocean’s chemistry. This could soon be fatal to coral reefs, which are havens for marine biodiversity and underpin the economies of many coastal...

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January 1, 2008

Speaker: Simon Levin
A sustainable future for humanity will require finding a way to share our complex environment. Learn about the evolution of cooperation in non-human populations, and what must change in our own behaviors if we are to have a common future.

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Washington, DC— Astronomers at the Carnegie Institution have found the first indications of highly complex organic molecules in the disk of red dust surrounding a distant star. The eight-million-year-old star, known as HR 4796A, is inferred to be in the late stages of planet...

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Plate tectonics, the geologic process responsible for creating the Earth’s continents, mountain ranges, and ocean basins, may be an on-again, off-again affair. Scientists have assumed that the shifting of crustal plates has been slow but continuous over most of the Earth’s history,...

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January 17, 2008

Michael Brown 
California Institute of Technology, Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences
Pluto is no longer a planet. Did it really have it coming or are astronomers just cosmic bullies? What else is out there at the edge of the solar system? Are...

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Pasadena, CA—The Royal Astronomical Society has awarded Stephen Shectman...

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Since we can’t sample the deepest regions of the Earth, scientists watch the velocity of seismic waves as they travel through the planet to determine the composition...

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After a journey of more than 2.2 billion miles and three and a half years, NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft made its first flyby of Mercury just after 2 PM Eastern Standard Time on January 14, 2008. All seven scientific instruments...

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A discovery by scientists at the Carnegie Institution has opened the door to a new generation of piezoelectric materials that can convert mechanical strain into electricity and vice versa, potentially cutting costs and boosting performance in myriad applications ranging from medical...

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Long-time Carnegie Institution trustee William T. Golden was honored on January 25 by a symposium held in the institution's auditorium. Friends and colleagues recollected his decades of service to the institution, the nation, and the nearly 100 other organizations to which he lent his...

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Stanford, CA — Now that scientists have reached a consensus that carbon dioxide emissions from human activities are the major cause of global warming, the next question is: How can we stop it? Can we just cut back on carbon, or do we need to go cold turkey?...

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Washington, DC — Interstellar space may be strewn with tiny whiskers of carbon, dimming the light of far-away objects. This discovery by scientists at the Carnegie Institution may have implications for the “dark energy” hypothesis, proposed a decade ago in part to explain the...

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Stanford, CA—To the list of threats to...

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Washington, DC—The Royal Society of Edinburgh (RSE) announced March 4th...

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Stanford, CA — A startling discovery by scientists at the Carnegie Institution puts a new twist on photosynthesis, arguably the most important biological process on Earth. Photosynthesis by plants, algae, and some bacteria supports nearly all living things by...

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Former Carnegie president and trustee Philip Abelson “had at least nine scientific lives…” Read this memoir appearing in the Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society. http://www....

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Washington, DC—The organic soup that spawned life on Earth may have gotten generous helpings from outer space, according to a new study. Scientists at the Carnegie Institution have discovered concentrations of amino acids in two meteorites that are more than ten...

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