Press Releases

Monday, May 19, 2014

"Matt understood our Carnegie. He was excited about the potential of working with us. In parallel, we were thrilled with his ideas, which melded our current state of experience with projected innovative approaches for the future."

Monday, May 19, 2014

 

By unanimous vote of the Carnegie Board of Trustees, Dr. Matthew P. Scott has been appointed the 10th president of the Carnegie Institution for Science. Dr. Scott is Professor of Developmental Biology, Genetics, Bioengineering, and Biology at the Stanford University School of Medicine and will succeed the current President, Dr. Richard A. Meserve, on September 1, 2014.

“This is an extraordinary time for the Carnegie Institution for Science”, said Co-Chairs Suzanne Nora Johnson and Stephen Fodor. “The scientific departments are flourishing with strong support from Trustees and a well performing endowment. The Trustees and Departmental Directors all believe Dr. Scott captures the independent spirit of Carnegie Science’s long tradition of leading science at the frontiers. We are enthusiastic about his leadership.”

Thursday, May 15, 2014

Audio
All living cells are held together by membranes, which provide a barrier to the transport of nutrients. They are also the communication platform connecting the outside world to the cell’s interior control centers. Thousands of proteins reside in these cell membranes and control the flow of select chemicals, which move across the barrier and mediate the flux of nutrients and information.  Little was known about the relationships among membrane proteins and interior proteins. A team of scientists has revealed how membrane proteins were networked with each other and with the signaling proteins inside the cell.

Thursday, May 1, 2014

Audio
Plants spend their entire lifetime rooted to one spot. When faced with a bad situation, such as a swarm of hungry herbivores or a viral outbreak, they have no option to flee but instead must fight to survive. What is the key to their defense? Chemistry.  Understanding how plants evolved this prodigious chemical vocabulary has been a longstanding goal in plant biology.

Thursday, May 1, 2014

Video
New work from a team of scientists including Carnegie’s Josh Simon analyzed the chemical elements in the faintest known galaxy, called Segue 1, and determined that it is effectively a fossil galaxy left over from the early universe. 

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Astronomer and instrumentation expert Stephen Shectman of the Carnegie Observatories has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences.

Friday, April 25, 2014

Video
Despite overwhelming scientific evidence for the impending dangers of human-made climate change, policy decisions leading to substantial emissions reduction have been slow.  New work finds that even as extreme weather events influence those who experience them to support policy to address climate change, waiting for the majority of people to live through such conditions firsthand could delay meaningful action by decades.

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Linda Elkins-Tanton, director of the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, is resigning her position at Carnegie, effective May 9, 2014. She has accepted a position as the director of the School of Earth and Space Exploration at Arizona State University, starting July 1, 2014. 

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Audio
Photosynthesis provides fixed carbon and energy for nearly all life on Earth, yet many aspects of this fascinating process remain mysterious. We do not know the full list of the parts of the molecular machines that perform photosynthesis in any organism. A team of researchers has developed a highly sophisticated tool that will transform the work of plant geneticists by addressing this problem and making large-scale genetic characterization of a photosynthetic algae possible for the first time.

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Audio
Floods and droughts are increasingly in the news, and climate experts say their frequency will only go up in the future. As such, it is crucial for scientists to learn more about how these extreme events affect plants in order to prepare for and combat the risks to food security that could result. New work from Carnegie will allow researchers, for the first time, to measure the levels of a plant hormone involved in responses to drought stress in individual plant cells in real time.