Press Releases

Tuesday, July 1, 2014

The Department of Energy (DOE) has awarded Carnegie $10 million over four years for basic research that could lead to the discovery of new energy materials through its program to support Energy Frontier Research Centers.

Tuesday, July 1, 2014

Washington, D.C.-—The American Geophysical Union (AGU) announced on June 30 that Christopher Field will receive the Roger Revelle Medal. Field is director of Carnegie’s Department of Global Ecology.

Monday, June 9, 2014

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Soil is a microscopic maze of nooks and crannies that hosts a wide array of life. Plants explore this environment by developing a complex branched network of roots that tap into scarce resources such as water and nutrients. How roots sense which regions of soil contain water and what effect this moisture has on the architecture of the root system has been unclear until now. New research focuses on how physical properties of a root’s local environment control root branching and through which developmental pathways these signals act.

Thursday, June 5, 2014

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A team of researchers studying a flowering plant has zeroed in on the way cells manage external signals about prevailing conditions, a capability that is essential for cells to survive in a fluctuating environment.

Tuesday, June 3, 2014

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An international team of astronomers, including five Carnegie scientists, reports the discovery of two new planets orbiting a very old star that is near to our own Sun. One of these planets orbits the star at the right distance to allow liquid water to exist on its surface, a key ingredient to support life. 

Thursday, May 29, 2014

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A woman’s supply of eggs is a precious commodity because only a few hundred mature eggs can be produced throughout her lifetime and each must be as free as possible from genetic damage. Part of egg production involves a winnowing of the egg supply during fetal development, childhood and into adulthood down from a large starting pool. New research offers fresh insights into the earliest stages of egg selection, which may have broad implications for women’s health and fertility. 

Thursday, May 22, 2014

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Breaking research news from a team of scientists led by Carnegie’s Ho-kwang “Dave” Mao reveals that the composition of the Earth’s lower mantle may be significantly different than previously thought. 

Wednesday, May 21, 2014

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Wolf-Rayet stars are very large and very hot. Astronomers have long wondered whether Wolf-Rayet stars are the progenitors of certain types of supernovae. New work has identified a Wolf-Rayet star as the likely progenitor of a recently exploded supernova. 

Wednesday, May 21, 2014

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The structures and star populations of massive galaxies appear to change as they age, but much about how these galaxies formed and evolved remains mysterious. Many of the oldest and most massive galaxies reside in clusters, enormous structures where numerous galaxies are found concentrated together. Galaxy clusters in the early universe are thought to be key to understanding the lifecycles of old galaxies, but to date astronomers have located only a handful of these rare, distant structures. New research has confirmed the presence of an unusually distant galaxy cluster, JKCS 041. 

Monday, May 19, 2014

“Matt Scott is the perfect choice to lead the Carnegie Institution for Science. A world-renowned geneticist, his wide-ranging discoveries have illuminated how the body takes shape during embryonic development and led to the development of new cancer therapies. He is unusual in the breadth of his interests, not just in the biological but also in the physical sciences, making him a perfect match for the range of scientific activities at the Institution. He is also a gifted leader, with vision and a flair for talent, a supportive mentor and an exceptional communicator. I am confident he will take Carnegie to even greater heights.”