Press Releases

Wednesday, February 19, 2014

The international consortium of the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) project has passed two major reviews and is positioned to enter the construction phase. When completed, the 25-meter GMT will have more than six times the collecting area of the largest telescopes today and ten times the resolution of the Hubble Space Telescope.

Tuesday, February 18, 2014

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As every gardner knows, nitrogen is crucial for a plant’s growth. But nitrogen absorption is inefficient. This means that on the scale of food crops, adding significant levels of nitrogen to the soil through fertilizer presents a number of problems, particularly river and groundwater pollution. As a result, finding a way to improve nitrogen uptake in agricultural products could improve yields and decrease risks to environmental and human health. New work from Carnegie's Cheng-Hsun Ho and Wolf Frommer developed tools that could help scientists observe the nitrogen-uptake process in real time and could lead to developments that improve agriculture and the environment.

Thursday, February 13, 2014

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The pace of global warming over the last century has been about twice as rapid over land than over the oceans and will continue to be more dramatic going forward if emissions are not curbed. According to an analysis of 27 climate models by Carnegie’s Chris Field, if we continue along the current emissions trajectory, we are likely facing the most rapid large climate change in the last 65 million years. This will clearly pose great challenges for a variety of terrestrial ecosystems.

Tuesday, February 4, 2014

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New research shows that a remarkable defect in synthetic diamond produced by chemical vapor deposition allows researchers to measure, witness, and potentially manipulate electrons in a manner that could lead to new “quantum technology” for information processing.

Monday, February 3, 2014

Carnegie’s Li-Quing Chen, recipient of a Tansley Medal for Excellence in Plant Science, announced late last year, is honored with an editorial and minireview in New Phytologist this month. 

Thursday, January 23, 2014

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Exposure to environmental endocrine disrupters, such as bisphenol A, which mimic estrogen, is associated with adverse health effects. Bisphenol A is commonly found in plastic bottles and plastic food containers. New research on the effects of these chemicals on zebrafish shows that embryonic heart valves could be particularly in danger.

Thursday, January 23, 2014

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Losing or gaining chromosomes during the process of cell division can lead to cancer and other diseases, so understanding mitosis is important for developing therapeutic strategies.

New research from a team led by Carnegie's Yixian Zheng focused on one important part of this process. Her results improve our understanding of how cell division gives rise to two daughter cells with an equal complement of chromosomes. 

Friday, January 10, 2014

Christopher Field, the founding director of Carnegie’s Department of Global Ecology and co-chair of the United Nation’s Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC), Working Group 2, has been awarded the BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award in Climate Change.

Thursday, December 19, 2013

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Table salt, sodium chloride, is one of the first chemical compounds that schoolchildren learn. New research from a team including Carnegie’s Alexander Goncharov shows that under certain high-pressure conditions, plain old salt can take on some surprising forms that violate standard chemistry predictions and may hold the key to answering questions about planet formation.

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

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Forest conservation is an issue of major concern to communities large and small around the globe. But gathering the monitoring data needed to make the right decisions has proven extremely prohibitive for individuals to entire governments. Carnegie’s Greg Asner is hoping to change that by making advanced forest monitoring tools available to the public, free of charge, and putting the power to monitor forests directly into the hands of people around the world. Today the Department of Global Ecology launched the Carnegie Landsat Analysis System-lite (or CLASlite) Classroom hosted by Stanford University Online Learning. It will allow non-commercial users to learn how to use the revolutionary CLASlite software for detecting deforestation and other forest disturbances.