Press Releases

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Audio 
A team of researchers working on a Carnegie expedition in Australia’s Great Barrier Reef has documented that coral growth rates have plummeted 40 percent since the mid-1970s. The scientists suggest that ocean acidification may be playing an important role in this perilous slowdown. 

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Audio
Quasars are supermassive black holes that live at the center of distant massive galaxies. They shine as the most luminous beacons in the sky across the entire electromagnetic spectrum by rapidly accreting matter into their gravitationally inescapable centers. New work from Carnegie solves a quasar mystery that astronomers have been puzzling over for 20 years. It shows that most observed quasar phenomena can be unified with two simple quantities: one that describes how efficiently the hole is being fed, and the other that reflects the viewing orientation of the astronomer. 

Tuesday, September 9, 2014

A team of scientists led by Carnegie's Jacqueline Faherty has discovered the first evidence of water ice clouds on an object outside of our own Solar System. Water ice clouds exist on our own gas giant planets--Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune--but have not been seen outside of the planets orbiting our Sun until now. Their findings are published by The Astrophysical Journal Letters. Video produced and directed by Brian Patrick Abbott.

Monday, September 8, 2014

The General Motors Corporation is presenting a $5,000.00 award to Carnegie’s BioEYES K-12 educational program on September 11, 2014, to deliver a two-week environmental curriculum, Your Watershed, Your Backyard. The event will start at 11: 45 AM, at GM’s Baltimore Operations, 10301 Philadelphia Rd., White March, MD.

Wednesday, September 3, 2014

New work has for the first time elucidated the atomic structures of the bacterial prototype of sugar transporters, termed “SWEET” transporters, found in plants and humans. These bacterial sugar transporters are called SemiSWEETs, because they are just half the size of the human and plant ones. The findings have potential practical applications for improving crop yields as well as for addressing human diseases such as diabetes. 

Friday, August 29, 2014

Dr. Matthew P. Scott joins the Carnegie Institution for Science as its 10th president September 1, 2014. Scott was Professor of Developmental Biology, Genetics, Bioengineering, and Biology at the Stanford University School of Medicine. He spent nearly 24 years at Stanford. The Carnegie board of trustees announced his appointment in May.

Friday, August 22, 2014

Audio
Everyone’s heard of the birds and the bees. But that old expression leaves out the flowers that are being fertilized. The fertilization process for flowering plants is particularly complex and requires extensive communication between the male and female reproductive cells. New research from an international team reports discoveries in the chemical signaling process that guides flowering plant fertilization.

Thursday, August 14, 2014

Wendy Freedman, the Crawford H. Greenewalt Director of the Carnegie Observatories and chair of the Giant Magellan Telescope Organization has accepted a position as a University Professor of Astronomy & Astrophysics at the University of Chicago, departing Carnegie September 1, 2014. Associate Director for Academic Affairs at the Observatories, John Mulchaey, will take over then as acting director.

Monday, August 4, 2014

Video
Astronomers have discovered an extremely cool object that could have a particularly diverse history—although it is now as cool as a planet, it may have spent much of its youth as hot as a star. The current temperature of the object is intermediate between that of the Earth and of Venus. However, the object shows evidence implying that a potentially large change in temperature has taken place. In the past this object would have been as hot as a star for many millions of years.

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Molybdenum disulfide is a compound often used in dry lubricants and in petroleum refining. Its semiconducting ability and similarity to the carbon-based graphene makes molybdenum disulfide of interest to scientists as a possible candidate for use in the manufacture of electronics, particularly photoelectronics. New work reveals that molybdenum disulfide becomes metallic under intense pressure.