Season

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Michael Gazzaniga

Neuroscientists have been studying individual cognitive states for decades. They are now applying advanced quantitative techniques to the challenge of understanding how the brain forms judgments, moral responses, and social comparisons. Learn why this work has implications for judicial practice and the law.

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Richard Alley

Supplying the energy we want without changing the climate on which we depend is clearly possible and potentially profitable. And there is increasing evidence that failure to do so could have unpleasant consequences.

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Michael Brown

Pluto is no longer a planet. Did it really have it coming or are astronomers just cosmic bullies? What else is out there at the edge of the solar system? Are astronomers done mucking with the solar system, or is more to come?

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Edward “Rocky” Kolb

Ninety-five percent of the universe is missing! Astronomical observations suggest that most of the mass of the universe is in a mysterious form called dark matter and most of the energy in the universe is in an even more mysterious form called dark energy. Unlocking the secrets of dark matter and dark energy will illuminate the nature of space and time and connect the quantum world with the cosmos.

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Lene Hau

Learn how physicists slow light to bicycle speed in clouds of atoms cooled with lasers to a few billionths of a degree above absolute zero. In Dr. Hau’s experiments, she stops and extinguishes a light pulse in one part of space and revives it in a completely different location. In the process, light is turned into matter and then back into light.

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Tanya Atwater

Most of North America’s large-scale topographic features formed during plate tectonic events over very long periods, while many of their most striking landforms developed during the recent ice ages.With maps, images, and computer animations, explore these two very distinct phenomena and how they interacted to make some of our favorite landscapes.
Dr. Atwater's animations are available for direct download at emvc.geol.ucsb.edu. Her Capital Science lecture is available as streaming video below.